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jamesabretney
07-20-2013, 04:33 AM
http://thekursk.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/e8b11-front_cover_2copy.jpg?w=224&h=320

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/q71/s320x320/1000404_469624616465147_881001696_n.jpg

http://thekursk.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/p4_letters.jpg?w=450

The Kursk by Sasha Janowicz is the graphic novel adaptation of the award winning play by the same name. K-141 Kursk was an Oscar-II class nuclear-powered cruise missile submarine of the Russian Navy, lost with all hands when it sank in the Barents Sea on 12 August 2000. Kursk.

Discover a new world, world of intrigue and honor, of danger and mystery! Sasha’s play won the 2007 Bell Award for Best New Play, the Matilda award three times for Best New Australian Play, Best Direction, and Best Independent Production, Matilda Awards.

http://www.lightstation.com/images/The_Kursk_2.jpg

It is a good story about bravery and courage and it raises questions about what really happened and the people deserve answers. The families of those who died deserve answers to what happened and how their loved ones lived and died.

Pitch video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=sx61NzIv4og
Endorsed by Jim Profit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwwD8cmpyc8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwwD8cmpyc8


http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/help-the-kursk-sail-again/x/268132?c=home
https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Kursk-by-Sasha-Janowicz/444388175655458
http://thekursk.wordpress.com/

Jack the R
07-20-2013, 04:26 PM
Putting a ww2 sub on the cover instead of the Kursk seems odd.

jamesabretney
07-20-2013, 07:16 PM
https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc1/q71/s320x320/1005145_469624619798480_1795131562_n.jpg
page 2


On the days leading to the accident, the Russian Navy conducted the largest naval exercises since the Old Soviet Days. Rumored to observe the exercises surreptitiously were 2 Los Angeles class submarines - the Toledo and the Memphis.
http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk163/040712-N-0119G-011.jpg

Also rumored to observe the exercises was the HMS Splendid:
http://blackpoolsubmariners.weebly.com/uploads/4/7/5/8/4758090/1656757_orig.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/71/Royal_Navy_Submarine_HMS_Splendid_MOD_45138102.jpg

jamesabretney
07-20-2013, 07:27 PM
Putting a ww2 sub on the cover instead of the Kursk seems odd.

The cover is just a draft. Graphic designer and European designer Sławomir Nietupski will finalize the design shortly. For a look inside his portfolio, check out:

http://snietupski.deviantart.com/
https://www.facebook.com/slawomir.nietupski
http://www.metal-archives.com/artists/Nahald/74627
http://www.artserwis.pl/portfoliobrowser.php?gid=4489

Jack the R
07-21-2013, 12:19 AM
You might wanna shrink those images down.

I've heard the collission theory before. Doubtful we'll ever know the truth, but the historical speculation is always entertaining.

Here's a Russian warship ramming a U.S. warship - Link. (http://youtu.be/N4jQhnXrWbg) There's a few videos like this on YouTube, various countries getting aggressive. All fun and games until someone gets hurt.

jamesabretney
07-21-2013, 04:58 AM
this thread is about the Kursk, the Russian people and all peoples. It has a lot to do conflicts between cover ups and patriotism.

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/48695000/jpg/_48695576_jex_776425_de27-1.jpg

It has a lot to do with an on-going undeclared war under the sea between the US and Russia. I can honestly see something like this happening in America today. It probably already has happened but unlike the Russian people of 2000, do we even whimper a protest?

http://www.robertamsterdam.com/assets_c/2010/08/kursk_007-thumb-510x382.jpg
The Kursk was the Russian 9/11. It forever changed how the Russian people relate to their government. The old Soviet days of use and abuse were over.

This story is about honoring the families:
http://www.one-gospel.org/mylife/kursk.jpg
telling their story as best we can. We are in contact with two of the families of the survivors and invite them to tell their story and that the freedom loving people of the world are listening and we stand with them.

jamesabretney
07-22-2013, 02:41 AM
You might wanna shrink those images down.

I've heard the collission theory before. Doubtful we'll ever know the truth, but the historical speculation is always entertaining.

Here's a Russian warship ramming a U.S. warship - Link. (http://youtu.be/N4jQhnXrWbg) There's a few videos like this on YouTube, various countries getting aggressive. All fun and games until someone gets hurt.

I saw that video. That was crazy. To be fair, they were 7 miles away from Soviet territory. Of course, they thought we would invade them 1941 style

jamesabretney
07-22-2013, 02:49 AM
1990 Work Started

1992 Laid Down

1994 Commissioned

1999 Kursk carried out a successful reconnaissance mission in the Mediterranean, tracking the United States Sixth Fleet during the Kosovo War


http://www.defence-point.gr/news/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/kursk-submarine.jpg

1128 hours 12-Aug-00 there was an explosion while preparing to fire

1130 hours 12-Aug-00 The second explosion ripped a 2-square-metre (22 sq ft) hole in the hull of the craft, which was designed to withstand depths of 1,000 metres (3,300 ft), and also ripped open the third and fourth compartments.The second was 45 to 50 times bigger than the first, suggesting that one or more of the Kursk's own torpedoes had exploded.

That appears to be confirmed by the extent of the damage to the forward part of the submarine, but the cause of the first explosion is still unknown. Water poured into these compartments at 90,000 litres (3,200 cu ft) per second killing all those in the compartments, including five officers from 7th SSGN Division Headquarters.

The fifth compartment contained the ship's two nuclear reactors, encased in 13 centimetres (5.1 in) of steel and resiliently mounted to absorb shocks in excess of 50g. The bulkheads of the fifth compartment withstood the explosion, allowing the two reactors to shut down automatically and preventing nuclear meltdown or contamination
http://www.starfiretor.com/FEP/pix/KurskVideo_LtColDmitryKolesnikov_message.jpg
Dmitry Koleznikov
12-Aug-00 Twenty-three men working in the sixth through ninth compartments survived the two blasts. They gathered in the ninth compartment, which contained the secondary escape hatch (the primary hatch having been in the destroyed second compartment).

Captain-lieutenant Dmitri Kolesnikov (one of three surviving officers of that rank) appears to have taken charge, writing down the names of those who were in the ninth compartment.

0840 hours 13-Aug-00 the rescue ship Rudnitsky carrying two submersible rescue vessels, AS-32 and the Priz (AS-34) reached the disaster area at around 8:40 AM the following morning.

14-Aug-00 CBS News reports that the Russian Navy is communicating with the sailors via Morse Code and that 2 Los Angeles class submarines

16-Aug-00 the Russian government accepted the British and Norwegian governments' assistance

17-Aug-00 a rescue ship was dispatched from Norway

18-Aug-00 Nadezhda Tylik, mother of Kursk submariner Lt. Sergei Tylik, produced an intense emotional outburst in the middle of an in-progress news briefing about Kursk's fate. After attempts to quiet her failed, a nurse injected her with a sedative by force from the back, and she was removed from the room, incapacitated. The event, caught on film, caused further criticism of the government's response to both the disaster, and how the government handled public criticism of said response.

19-Aug-00 Norwegian Rescue ship reaches the site

20-Aug-00 British and Norwegian deep-sea divers reached the ninth compartment escape hatch. They were able to determine that the compartment was flooded, and all hope of finding survivors was lost.

Jack the R
07-22-2013, 04:47 AM
I wonder why the Russians are historically at odds with the other white countries. Accent aside I couldn't distinguish a Russian from a white American. Maybe the European peoples have an easier time telling each other apart.

Magnus
07-23-2013, 03:28 AM
I wonder why the Russians are historically at odds with the other white countries. Accent aside I couldn't distinguish a Russian from a white American. Maybe the European peoples have an easier time telling each other apart.


There are lots of "white" countries at odds with other "white" countries. France and England is a classic example. There is a lot of unrest in Europe, as it's always been. But it's usually contained enough not to turn into violent retorts or fighting.

jamesabretney
07-23-2013, 04:16 AM
http://www.murman.ru/kurskmem/images/kursk3.jpg

just got a $ 200 donation from a contributor on this forum – called gogabber. I am feeling humbled & grateful.


I want to thank the contributor who wishes to remain anonymous.

I wrote this on a sister site:

It has been 20 years since the end of the Soviet Union and the fall of the Berlin Wall. Yet our two nations are engaged in undeclared war under the sea. We kept this secret because we had been on war footing for decades. We did not have a discussion about it in a democratic way. Bureaucrats in Washington and Moscow decided this because it was war.

But we are not at war anymore. If this country had something to do with the deaths of these men, we owe the Russian people at a minimum an explanation. If we had nothing to do with it, then why not open up an unbiased independent investigation. It would do much to de-escalate tensions between our nations due to the reset.

The Russians do not have clean hands in this affair. But I believe the Russian people will handle their business in their own way.

jamesabretney
07-24-2013, 06:19 AM
http://cache4.asset-cache.net/gc/852910-the1997-file-photo-shows-russian-lt-dmitry-gettyimages.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=OCUJ5gVf7YdJQI2Xhkc2QINOxcDHzGlhYL8PyVNlOmDNSwI3 1qPU%2BRXBwlpm0E9FtrcY0F9LSrNhqr%2FsaAbBeQ%3D%3D

"It's 13:15. All personnel from section six, seven and eight have moved to section nine. There are 23 people here. We have made the decision because none of us can escape. I am writing this blind."

The discovery of the note contradicts the official version of what happened to the crew and embarrasses the Russian navy further. It has issued numerous contradictory accounts of the fate of the sailors.

As it became clear that the Russian rescue attempts were going to fail, the navy took the line that all 118 crew died "within minutes", after several explosions ripped through the Kursk. The note shows that at least a fifth of the crew survived for at least several hours. A Norwegian seismic station recorded two explosions at 11.30am on Saturday, Aug 12.

http://gfx.dagbladet.no/kultur/2001/04/03/KurskSak.jpg
http://2001.novayagazeta.ru/nomer/2001/73n/73n-s06.jpg
http://static.themoscowtimes.com/upload//photos/large/2001_08/2001_08_10//kursk_note_2.jpghttp://static.themoscowtimes.com/upload//photos/large/2000_11/2000_11_02//02kol12.jpg

Kolesnikov's tearful widow, Olga, a teacher, said last night: "I had a premonition my husband didn't die instantly. The pain I felt then has come true. I'm preparing for a meeting with him. I want to see him again. I want to read his letter."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/norway/1372059/Doomed-sailors-letter-from-the-Kursk.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u6EdiESzq8


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Vladimir_Putin_in_KGB_uniform.jpg/170px-Vladimir_Putin_in_KGB_uniform.jpg

Jack the R
07-24-2013, 04:26 PM
Magnus - Do you object to "white?" I've read the idea of "white" was invented by rich Virginians to keep poor blacks and European immigrants divided. I read it on the internet though, so who knows? Perhaps Europe doesn't have the term.



But we are not at war anymore. If this country had something to do with the deaths of these men, we owe the Russian people at a minimum an explanation. If we had nothing to do with it, then why not open up an unbiased independent investigation. It would do much to de-escalate tensions between our nations due to the reset.

We've got another proxy war going in Syria, which could expand into a World War.

At any rate I don't expect the U.S. to talk about anything that could reveal the capabilities of submarines.

jamesabretney
07-26-2013, 01:15 AM
Magnus - Do you object to "white?" I've read the idea of "white" was invented by rich Virginians to keep poor blacks and European immigrants divided. I read it on the internet though, so who knows? Perhaps Europe doesn't have the term.




We've got another proxy war going in Syria, which could expand into a World War.

At any rate I don't expect the U.S. to talk about anything that could reveal the capabilities of submarines.

The first slave owner in America was Anthony Johnson who won the right to keep another man as his property in the colonial courts of Virginia in 1634. He was black

I am tired of proxy wars with Russia - Kosovo and now Syria?

Agree on subs

Jack the R
07-27-2013, 04:19 AM
The first slave owner in America was Anthony Johnson who won the right to keep another man as his property in the colonial courts of Virginia in 1634. He was black


True, but it doesn't mean rich white plantation owners later didn't work to divide poor whites and blacks.

Scribbly
07-27-2013, 03:19 PM
The first slave owner in America was Anthony Johnson who won the right to keep another man as his property in the colonial courts of Virginia in 1634. He was black.
Slavery did exist in the Americas way before 1634.
Slavery in ( North) America began when the first African slaves were brought to the North American colony of Jamestown, Virginia, in 1619 for work in the crop of cotton and tobacco.
This actually did happen due the fact that native Indians would refuse or were unreliable for go and work
in servitude for the new white settlers.

The case Anthony Johnson Vs Casor (1634) was the first time that an incident over slavery ownership was
brought to an American Court.
Until this incident, slavery was working in America as a profitable and known institution without any
legal format. It become legal in 1670 to be abolished after the Civil War in 1865.

True, but it doesn't mean rich white plantation owners later didn't work to divide poor whites and blacks.I don't see the need for plantation owners of work on dividing whites and blacks.
The black slaves were living permanently inside the owner's plantation with not chances for any contact with regular white population rather than the owner's family.
The slave supervisors were black people and the managers were white people.
These white people were the servants of the plantation owners whom usually were of rich and nobility heritage.
After the war and the Emancipation, the plantation owners had no power to divide no one from no one.


In South America, the trade (Atlantic slave trade of Africans)
It did start in the 1500 to 1800 going from the Caribbean to Mexico and Brazil.
Africans were captured by other Africans and then traded to Europeans in exchange
for goods, tools, textiles and guns.
The traders were British, Portuguese, Dutch, French and Spanish. They were doing the traveling
across the Ocean and the selling of slaves to the Colonies.
Everybody was trying to get part in the business.

Centuries before that, it was the Arab slave trade in Africa
beginning in the 650 full active to 1700.

In Africa, the institution of slavery did start by the times of the Ancient Egyptians
and it continues to the current day.

America is the only country in the world that went into war for abolishing slavery.

Sorry by the derail.

Jack the R
07-28-2013, 04:34 AM
We need a new thread for this.

Scribbly, what I read likely referred to the post-slavery era.

Incidentally slavery was abolished in many American states before 1865. In some states it was never legal (at least, once the territory became an American state). People need to realize it was necessary to keep the South in the Union. The U.S. was fighting the British again in 1812. The U.S. wasn't always the world power it is today, and might have been picked off by a European country if it had split into North and South earlier (which wouldn't have freed the Southern slaves anyway).

jamesabretney
07-29-2013, 08:59 PM
Submaritime Navigation is a very dangerous activity. American authors Sherry Sontag, Christopher Drew, and Annette Lawrence Drew likened the activity to a Blind Man's Bluff (http://www.amazon.com/books/dp/006097771X) where you are literally traversing through the ocean blind.

The Telegraph has reported as recently as 2011 of the 22 maritime accidents 19 are with submarines by which Americans lead with the most accidents 9 of which I will explore in a subsequent article.

Here is a list of Russian Submarine and Nuclear Accidents

1995 A nuclear submarine had its electricity cut by an electricity company at a naval base due to unpaid bills. The submarine's cooling system ceased to function and the reactor "came close to meltdown".
http://www.urbanghostsmedia.com/home/twamoran/urbanghostsmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/abandoned-submarine.jpg
2000
Jun-00 A fuel leak from a missile poisoned servicemen at a naval base in Russia's Far East.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4e/Soviet_Pacific_Fleet_1990.jpg/800px-Soviet_Pacific_Fleet_1990.jpg


12-Aug-00 The OSCAR II-class nuclear-powered submarine Kursk sank due to an explosion of ordnance in its torpedo room in the Barents Sea, killing all the 118 submariners on board.

30-Aug-03 The decommissioned NOVEMBER-class nuclear-powered submarine K-159 sank while it was being towed to a harbour in the Barents Sea to be stripped of its nuclear reactors. 9 crew died.


2005
Aug-05 The Royal Navy and the U.S. Navy provided assistance to rescue seven Russian sailors trapped in a minisubmarine that had become entangled in submerged nets off Russia’s Pacific coastline near Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy.

2006
7-Sep-06 a fire broke out in the submarine, Daniil Moskovskiy (St Daniel of Moscow), as it was being towed across the Barents Sea to a base in Vidyayevo. Two on board died.

2008
8-Nov-08 the AKULA II-class submarine K-152 Nerpa's freon fire extinguishing system was accidentally activated, killing 20 and injuring at least 22 people. The incident occurred while the submarine was conducting sea trials.

2009
Mar-09 a fire broke out on the hull of the decommissioned nuclear submarine, Orenburg, while at the Severodvinsk docks.

Oct-09 another blaze occurred during the decommissioning of the nuclear submarine, Kazan, again at Severodvinsk.

14-Nov-09 explosion on the outskirts of Ulyanovsk at Arsenal 31, a navy depot. 2 firemen died during the decommissioning of munitions.

23-Nov-09 second explosion at Arsenal 31. 8 soldiers died as they removed munitions.


2010
Feb-10 a blaze broke out on a decommissioned nuclear submarine, the Ak Bars, at Severodvinsk, on the Barents Sea. Casualties unknown.

2011
26-May-11 explosion in an arms depot in the village of Urman in Bashkortostan. 12 people were hurt and 40 buildings damaged. Over 2,000 people were evacuated from the surrounding area. The cause was blamed by an official on the "combustion of gunpowder traces".

2-Jun-11 explosion in an arms depot near the city of Izhevsk. 20,000 inhabitants of the surrounding area had to be evacuated. 95 people were injured in the blast, and 2 elderly people nearby died of heart attacks possibly caused by the sound of the blast. Windows were shatterd up to 10*km away. A discarded cigarette has initially been blamed for the blast.

29-Dec-11 the Yekaterinburg Delta-IV-class nuclear submarine, while in dry-dock in the Roslyakovo shipyard, north of Murmansk, caught fire after a blaze broke out on scaffolding that had been erected around it. The rubber outer hull was badly burnt. 9 people were injured fighting the fire. No radiation leak was detected.

2012
26-Sep-12 explosion at an arms depot 180km northwest of Orenburg killed one officer.

Oct-12 explosion at an arms depot in the Orenburg region. 4,000 tons of munitions exploded when a soldier failed to extinguish his cigarette. One officer was injured and inhabitants of the surrounding area had to be evacuated.

2013
18-19 June 2013 explosion at the Chapaevsk arms depot in the Samara region. 6,000 inhabitants of the surrounding area had to be evacuated. 30 people were injured in the blast caused by the "involuntary" explosion of shells.

James A. Bretney
06-22-2014, 07:24 PM
check out my book about Russia written by a Russian. http://www.amazon.com/The-Kursk-1-Sasha-Janowicz-ebook/dp/B00K65KJP0 … K-141 submarine free sample

crognus
06-24-2014, 04:28 PM
Not to be a brat, but shouldn't you credit it "Adapted by Sasha Janowicz" and "Written by Bryony Lavery", or at least something to that effect? (On the cover)