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j giar
06-01-2006, 01:28 PM
Read this today at CBR. Pretty much confirms what a lot of us have been talking about on different threads. Follow the link ladies and gents!
http://www.comicbookresources.com/columns/index.cgi?column=pd&article=2476#section2

D.J. Coffman
06-01-2006, 02:11 PM
That sounds more like an exercise to me, and not a way to save comics.

Saving comics is pretty simple actually. Get more comics into more people's hands. And you can't do that with the limited direct market.

Scott Story
06-01-2006, 02:48 PM
I couldn't even finish reading this. This is such a non-argument/idea on so many levels.

j giar
06-01-2006, 03:12 PM
That sounds more like an exercise to me, and not a way to save comics.

Saving comics is pretty simple actually. Get more comics into more people's hands. And you can't do that with the limited direct market.
I agree. The direct market, at least from an independent is a lost cause. I'm not saying we shouldn't try and put product there. But we are fighting for shelf space, which Marvel and DC dominate. Hwere I agree with Mr. Grant is that the current system that Diamond has set up is skewed against the independent market. So at that point how do you work with a system that doesn't work for you and your retailer is litterally bombarded by crap from the two big companies. The only choice left is creating another alternative system that would get your books in more hands and in front of more readers.
Yes?

Buckyrig
06-01-2006, 03:22 PM
Head shops and alternative record stores.

Isn't that where the direct market started anyway?

j giar
06-01-2006, 03:28 PM
Head shops and alternative record stores.

Isn't that where the direct market started anyway?
Long live The Freak Brothers!

j giar
06-01-2006, 03:31 PM
I couldn't even finish reading this. This is such a non-argument/idea on so many levels.
Explain??!!

ERoy
06-08-2006, 11:46 PM
Well, fixing the direct market is a start. Expanding on it is the next thing.

To me, comics seem to be one of the only markets where items are not returnable. Shops are unwilling or unable to give indie books a try or order proper amounts because they are stuck with what doesn't sell. Why there isn't a return policy for comics is beyond me.

Secondly, get comics into larger market. Put them in Wal-Mart and put exposure into them. Make it a mass-market again, and sales will go up.

Ingrid K. V. Hardy
06-09-2006, 08:14 AM
Well, fixing the direct market is a start. Expanding on it is the next thing.

To me, comics seem to be one of the only markets where items are not returnable. Shops are unwilling or unable to give indie books a try or order proper amounts because they are stuck with what doesn't sell. Why there isn't a return policy for comics is beyond me.

Secondly, get comics into larger market. Put them in Wal-Mart and put exposure into them. Make it a mass-market again, and sales will go up.


Not such a bad idea, really. The writer of a book for little kids I illustrated last year is trying to do just that - get it in to Walmart. Everybody goes there. Of course, Walmart is not famous for paying fairly.

Ron Phillips
06-09-2006, 09:22 AM
Well, fixing the direct market is a start. Expanding on it is the next thing.

To me, comics seem to be one of the only markets where items are not returnable. Shops are unwilling or unable to give indie books a try or order proper amounts because they are stuck with what doesn't sell. Why there isn't a return policy for comics is beyond me.

Secondly, get comics into larger market. Put them in Wal-Mart and put exposure into them. Make it a mass-market again, and sales will go up.

Comics in general, Wal-mart and the mass-market would help. I doubt, though, it would help the indy market. The big dogs would still be the big dogs, and shelf-space is even more limited than in book stores.

I'd like to see a nice clean chain of fan entertainment based stores, places that are accessable, bright and professional. Imagine books, comics, movies, music and games all in a nice mid-sized store in locations all across the states. I want to go into a store in any state in any major city and be able to know exactly where and what I'm looking for. Familiarity breeds acceptance.

It's a pipe dream ... but it'd be nice. And image the buying power it would have within the direct market?

j giar
06-09-2006, 10:30 AM
Comics in general, Wal-mart and the mass-market would help. I doubt, though, it would help the indy market. The big dogs would still be the big dogs, and shelf-space is even more limited than in book stores.

I'd like to see a nice clean chain of fan entertainment based stores, places that are accessable, bright and professional. Imagine books, comics, movies, music and games all in a nice mid-sized store in locations all across the states. I want to go into a store in any state in any major city and be able to know exactly where and what I'm looking for. Familiarity breeds acceptance.
It's a pipe dream ... but it'd be nice. And image the buying power it would have within the direct market?
Ron,
This has got to be one of the best ideas I've heard yet. Obviously movies and video games are as much an influence on or in comics as any other media. Instead of fighting and trying to compete with the gaming industry maybe embracing it and working with it is more plausible. I'm still not real sure about the Walmart gig. Being a family oriented company, I think some books would never find a home there. Look at the history of musical artist that have been boycotted and had their cd's either pulled or never put on the racks.

Ingrid K. V. Hardy
06-09-2006, 10:35 AM
Ron,
This has got to be one of the best ideas I've heard yet. Obviously movies and video games are as much an influence on or in comics as any other media. Instead of fighting and trying to compete with the gaming industry maybe embracing it and working with it is more plausible. I'm still not real sure about the Walmart gig. Being a family oriented company, I think some books would never find a home there. Look at the history of musical artist that have been boycotted and had their cd's either pulled or never put on the racks.

Very valid point. On my own, I almost certainly would not go there, it is not a very fair company anyway. I mentioned it because of course what the people who hire us do is out of our hands, and I certainly wish them luck. But the idea of having fan entertainment stores is excellent....

Aaron Hübrich
06-09-2006, 12:38 PM
This may piss off a lot of people here, but when we try and say as a community, "Hey, comics are cool!" it comes off as very "uncool" and desperate to many people. Other industries (such as movie and video games) tap comic artists and writers all the time. They don't give a rat's a$$ about the comic industry though...only the creative minds that make them. The comic industry exists because of the creators - not the other way around.

To save comics is to not do anything at all except make very good stuff, oddly enough. Let the genius come through and people will find it.

There's not enough "now" thinking. Many creators are caught up in how it was "so much better back then", or "if only there was this type of market". Would it really matter if you were just doing your thing? Would you stop making comics if there was no classic style distributor? Would you stop making comics if there were no "comic shops"?

Think about it this way too...Many people are worried about the music industry, but the musicians who don't worry about it and just write good music - and just do their thing, end up rising above it all somehow. As comic creators, I think it would be good to take the same attitude. Worry less about how "hard" it is or "why this distributor sucks". Just make good books and do your best to get it seen by as many people as possible. You want to save this industry, then get off your butt and make good comics, period.

j giar
06-09-2006, 12:52 PM
I agree in the fact that we, as an industry ned to put out quality product. That's a given. But no one will buy anything if they're not aware that it exists.

Buckyrig
06-09-2006, 01:01 PM
Psychic Marketing!! :bounce:

j giar
06-09-2006, 01:03 PM
Psychic Marketing!! :bounce:
:laugh:

Ingrid K. V. Hardy
06-09-2006, 01:44 PM
J giar, BTW, what's happening with SoulDriver? Are you putting it out soon?

j giar
06-09-2006, 02:01 PM
J giar, BTW, what's happening with SoulDriver? Are you putting it out soon?
Yes Mam'! It won't be until this first of the year. I've decided to bring on a letterer. I've gone back and forth with that one. I want it ready in time to take some promo material and pimp the hell out of it prior to and at Mid-Ohio. I'm trying not to release to much on it until it's closer. I did dump a bunch of sketches over at the artist thread. Thanks for asking jedi..hope things are well with you. :)

Raven
06-09-2006, 08:33 PM
Saving Comics:

Step 1: Create a shelf specifically for your new titles. The shelf must hold as many titles as possible, show as much of the cover as possible and take up very little space in the store.

Step 2: Get as many retailers as possible to install this single new shelf system, give it to them for free. This is very cheap to do.

Step 3: Print your comics to a new size closely resembling but a little bigger than current comics for this new shelf system.

Step 4: Give retailers a percentage of the sales of the books on your shelves, and front the cost to them, so you will be paid off the backend and they will keep their money. In other words, they don't pay for anything but get a percentage. They only pay you for the books they sold, the only real loss to them is theft which is their problem anyway.

Step 5:
Hire local distributors in areas throughout the world who will take a percentage of sales or a flat fee for stocking the shelves in their own sales areas. For example, there might be five different sales reps throughout New York. Every month they go to each store and restock, count and get paid for the sold issues. In is important that they recieve the stock every month.

This is how almost every small company makes it in the retail business, by carving a niche and maintaining it. Anyone who has worked in a grocery store has seen them do this.

If people can make a living off bread, which is made and tossed out on a daily basis, then you can make this system work for comics too.

Ron Phillips
06-09-2006, 08:46 PM
Only problem with that is that vendors pay for shelving space and management and sales of that shelving space is done by the local distributor. Now unless have it in your means to purchase said space on a national level, as well as the vendors to keep said shelf full then there is no way possible you could make money from your books.

Face it small press is small press because the companies and creators do not have the deep pockets to pull off inventive ideas.

BTW, why would you make the books larger?