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halw
06-06-2006, 12:46 AM
So this question doesn't neccesarily apply only to aspiring or published comic book writers but anyone who writes.

So I've had this idea for a few months that over the past few weeks has started to come out in notes, dialogue and scene layout up until about two weeks ago.

I'm not sure if's from exhaustion from work or just due to not feeling good on and off from the allergies this season(fun times) but I haven't been able to write much lately.

So I ask everyone the following:

1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?

2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?

ryanscottottney
06-06-2006, 12:55 AM
1. I write wherever I can. I jot notes on paper, but I do all my serious planning on the computer, so until I got this laptop last month, I was limited to writing in my room. But when I did, I would shut the door and turn on music or surf the web ... just relax my mind. People often confuse that with goofing off, and it's easy to get lost in that, so just be careful you don't begin to procrastinate.

2. I'm inspired by a fun idea that I want to develop. If I have an idea or concept that I think could be a lot of fun, I run with it until it either gets done or fizzles and dies somewhere down the road and is ultimately replaced by another.

3. Write anything. Just write. Keep your fingers moving on the keyboard and let the words come out. Write a journal. Write a letter. Transcribe your favorite song. Anything. And when you're in the writing groove, do that with your story. Write anything about your story. Don't worry how crappy it is. Write it. It's for your eyes only. Keep the fingers moving. Then go back and edit it later. Eventually you'll have something close to a solid foundation from which to stand on.

4. (freebie) Writing is not a machine that comes with an on/off switch. It's hard work, and it's frustrating when you can't get in the mood, or the ideas just aren't coming. You're at the mercy of that secret thing inside all of us. If anyone knew 100% how to break that thing down, they'd be millionaires. The truth is, it's a waiting game, and everyone is different.

Buckyrig
06-06-2006, 12:56 AM
So this question doesn't neccesarily apply only to aspiring or published comic book writers but anyone who writes.

So I've had this idea for a few months that over the past few weeks has started to come out in notes, dialogue and scene layout up until about two weeks ago.

I'm not sure if's from exhaustion from work or just due to not feeling good on and off from the allergies this season(fun times) but I haven't been able to write much lately.

So I ask everyone the following:

1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?

Utter chaos works for me...but I don't think that's normal. Quiet kills me. Usually something on TV (preferably sports since there will be no sound). For music, something loud and energetic when I am trying to think. Something mellow when I am actually writing. (Lots of Dire Straits for some reason. :confused: )

2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work

Anger and frustration. The news. Any piece of nonsense that strikes me...hard to say, but the anger and frustration are pretty standard.

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?

You've hit the boring part of writing. Get over it and man up and force something out onto the page. Outline the damn thing. You probably know your beginning and end...figure out how to connect them. Make sure you know your characters. If you do, you'll figure out the how. If you don't you're not ready to write the story yet. Let it bang around in your head for a while.

DungeonMasterJm
06-06-2006, 07:56 AM
To avoid distractions, I write with as little unneccessary noise as possible. And I usually sit in my bedroom or in front of my computer. On occassion I jot down notes for stories at work or try to work a story out in my head at work because I work 12 hours a work day.

Most of my writing just sort of hits me as far as inspiration goes. Otherwise, I usually decide to try and work a set of circumstances into a story. Sort of like: I want to write about my character finding himself in jeopardy of drowning in a flooding river and my character has several wounds - maybe a broken leg. And then I try to make plausible reasons for why he's in that position and the outcome.

DM Jim

Amtekoth
06-06-2006, 10:06 AM
1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?

2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?

1. I have a notepad with me everywhere I go to jot down those gems that will disappear if I don't. My co-workers laugh when they see me feverishly writing notes in a lab meeting, because they know it's fodder for Lab Bratz.

But the hard part - actually writing the stuff in script format - is done at the computer in our home office. No music, no TV, no surfing the internet, because I am a HORRIBLE procrastinator (actually I'm great at procrastinating...). I tend to write mostly at night, after the kids are asleep. If I have a deadline, I've been known to take a sick day from work and pound a story out.

2. The old Inspiration/Perspiration conundrum...
Everything inspires me to write, but I don't often follow through. If you are always waiting for the muse to smack you upside the brainpan, you're a dreamer, not a writer. If you start writing before you are inspired, the beginning stuff will be crap, but the juices will start flowing and the material will get better. You can always rewrite or throw away the early junk. Just don't get discouraged by the poor quality...it'll get better as the day goes on.

By the way, I ignore that very advice far too often because I was a dreamer WAY before I was a writer. Old habits die lingering deaths, and when you think you've defeated them, they poke up through the mental humus like zombies, intent on eating your brains.

3. Plant your butt on the seat, bub, and start writing.

DarkOra
06-06-2006, 10:12 AM
1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?
Anywhere and everywhere. Louder the better for me usually (lots of background noise helps me focus).

2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work
Me (and a love of storytelling).

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?
Either work on something else while that idea simmers, or if you have characters developed, run them through some fun situations (put them in scenes from your favorite comic/movie/novel to see what would happen and help bring them to life).

scottr
06-06-2006, 10:30 AM
I read that Stephen King has a little nook in a hallway where he writes, suprisingly humble and unspectacular. I think he also uses a brother word processor or something similarly outdated. I found that interesting.

1. I either write very early in the morning or very late at night, usually on my studio computer or on the living room couch with a laptop. I need silence, although occasionally I'll listen to classical music or movie soundtracks if it's turned down low enough. I never watch t.v. as a general rule when I'm writing or drawing. I write down ideas in my sketchbooks. I keep one in the car, one in the studio and one in the living room. I'll email myself notes and ideas also, if I'm away from home, most of that ends up in a computer file where it will simmer until I finally decide to start writing an actual script.

2. I'm not sure what 'motivates my brain to work' when I'm writing. If the story idea is interesting enough to me, I'll write it down until I eventually have a script.

3. You can't force inspiration, but at the same time you can't wait for inspiration to strike. Force yourself into a routine and determine a quota that you want to reach every day, whether that's 5 pages or 5 sentences. Write about anything, write about nothing. Eventually the ideas should come, and if you're lucky, inspiration.

D.J. Coffman
06-06-2006, 10:36 AM
I found myself abandoning the standard writing process and sort of drawing out my stories with notes, etc.

Definitly write or brainstorm wherever you are most comfortable.

imajica studio
06-06-2006, 10:49 AM
1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?
I start by jotting down notes on scrap pieces of paper or legal pads. IF I am working on a larger project I then transfer those notes to three ring binders. When actually working on the project I use my laptop, can be anywhere in our house but usually it is in our living room or in my office downstairs. Gotta love the wireless.
I need background noise. Usually it is my iPod, but it also can be TV which usually is on the history channel, something like that or a movie.

2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work
Anything can inspire me. Good or bad. World events, reading a good (or bad book)....

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?
Write, just write. If you get yourself into some routine that is even better. Set smaller goals for yourself. Even if it's 500 words a day or a page of script
Good luck

DannoE
06-06-2006, 10:57 AM
1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?
On the train to and from work. It's about a 70 minute commute. Sometimes noisey, sometimes quite. Always in my notebook.

2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work
I enjoy writing. I write about stuff that interests me, and I write about stuff from my everyday life. I work it out through my writing. I started after I got divorced and found that it helps keep me sane and calm.

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?
Are you sure you really want to do this? Maybe a different hobby would engage your passions more. Don't take that the wrong way, please. It's just that most writing is unspectacular. It's work. Look at it as work, and you'll be on your way. If you take it less seriously than the other work in your life, you might as well just stop or write for yourself in a journal. There's nothing wrong with either choice.

Scott Story
06-06-2006, 11:18 AM
1. Ideas come from everywhere. I never write them down, but if I wait the story forms up in my head. Once I've got a head of steam, I write it all down. I work at my computer, usually, with no music or tv or outside stimuli. I wait until I'm alone, because disruptions mess me up.

2. Ideas come when I daydream or draw in my sketchbook. When I draw characters, I usually think up their origens and particulars as I draw them. I usually daydream when I listen to really good music, often in the car, or as I'm working on art for clients.

3. If you have trouble making yourself write, then you may not be ready. Come back in ten or so years, when you really want it. Most writers love to write, can't wait to get back to it, dream about it when they are not writing, don't want to stop, etc. If that's not you, then maybe pursue what you do have a passion for.

MrGranger
06-06-2006, 11:24 AM
1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?

Coffee shop. I like the low din of other people, but not anything distracting.


2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work

Life. I keep a journal and have years of stories that I will get to...some already tried and failed but maybe as time passes I'll revisit. Whenever I get an idea I write it down.

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?
Check out some websites about the tools of writing.
http://artfulwriter.com/ is good
http://www.wordplayer.com
http://www.scriptsecrets.com
http://www.johnaugust.com/

and there are many others.

Instead of looking for inspiration or a new muse, I suggest filling your writer's toolbox with new gadgets to get the gears churning. I have a system, developed with much help, and now I can honestly sit down at any time and write. And not just meandering thoughts, but a real, honest-to-goodness story. If you've got your hammer and nail then you can hang your pictures anywhere at anytime.

Happy writing.

MrGranger
06-06-2006, 11:33 AM
3. If you have trouble making yourself write, then you may not be ready. Come back in ten or so years, when you really want it.

I'd say that this isn't great advice, when you write 24/7 for years you may find that writing is not just a matter of having your passion. You've got to have more than that. If it's only passion that drives your writing then you'll eventually run out of gas. The key is to know how to write even when your muse is taking a smoke break.

j giar
06-06-2006, 11:33 AM
1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?
I have a studio now that I can work in. If I'm writing dialogue I can't listen to music with lyrics..go figure. I'll listen to more instrumental..jazz, industrial, techno depends on the scenes or what I'm writing. I'm surrounded by action figures my kids have bought me in the past and alot of odd trinkets I've accumulated over the years. A very creative environment.
2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work
Music, movies, books, everyday conversations. Pretty much anything and everything around me. Thats why I keep a note pad with me. Ideas, dialogue...scenes..they all can come with out warning. I've been known to write on napkins..or sketch out scenes...characters.
3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?[/QUOTE]
Kevin Melrose gave me some excellent advice when I was having a similar problem and it worked for me. Try taking a break and work on something else. Just try to stay active. It will keep the creative juices flowing. I liked the other suggestion ..I believe from buckyrig, about outlining the story and forcing something out. When I began SOULDRIVER I had a beginning and an end. I've been working to connect the two. Stay creatively active!!! Good Luck. Jim Giar

theflash
06-06-2006, 01:11 PM
1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?

I never stop writing. that might sound weird, but i always find myself going over a story, considering how it continues, what comes next. i do most of my idea work in the shower actually. don't ask me why, but it seems to work. as for actually pounding the keys, i can't be around people. human distraction drives me insane. i always have a radio on, usually my mp3 library or XM 48 playing as background. when i'm at home i lock myself in my office, of wait until everyone else is asleep so i can be assured of being left alone.

2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work?

i get inspiration from a lot of places. if i find myself in a dead writing zone for some reason, i will stop and pick up a book and just read. or go see a movie. something to rest and reset my brain. anything will do as long as it takes me out of story mode and gives me a break. mini golf, paintball, whatever. when i get done, it's usually right back to the writing.

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?

my advice is to try different things. try pushing through it. if that works for you, then you're golden. if it doesn't, try taking a break from it and moving to something else. no one thing works for everyone, so you have to experiment.

scottr
06-06-2006, 01:29 PM
3. If you have trouble making yourself write, then you may not be ready. Come back in ten or so years, when you really want it.

Yikes! What happens when in ten years you are ready to write but then realize you don't have any experience writing?

r nelson
06-06-2006, 02:11 PM
If it's only passion that drives your writing then you'll eventually run out of gas. The key is to know how to write even when your muse is taking a smoke break. Ya know... Every once in awhile, you're immensely quotable, Shawn ;)

1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?

I like to have noise that doesn't require attention - sometimes it's a movie on the television I've seen a dozen times, sometimes it's an album I've heard over and over. Currently, it's re-runs of Law & Order. (Note, my TV is positioned such that, while I'm writing at the computer, my back is to it -- much harder to get sucked in that way).

2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work

For me, it usually starts with a character concept and then I try to find the perfect setting and story for that character.

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?

I have an ambitious writing schedule set up. Usually, that means I'm "behind" by my own standards, and that pressure helps me immensely. Sometimes it's overwhelming though. I've found that taking the pressure off sometimes helps, like changing gears while driving -- you can't always drive at 65 MPH.

Instead of "today I'm going to write that 22-page story" I'll reduce it to "today I'm going to write one GREAT page." Then, after one page is written, goals are met, and it's gravy from there.

3. If you have trouble making yourself write, then you may not be ready. Come back in ten or so years, when you really want it.
Yikes! What happens when in ten years you are ready to write but then realize you don't have any experience writing?

Believe it or not, I did just that. If you can write at twenty you'll still be able to write at thirty, and you may be a little more focused, mature, etc. That's how it worked for me.

- Richard

j giar
06-06-2006, 02:36 PM
Excuse me Mr. Nelson..but did you just use the word ALBUM. :laugh: I took my oldest daughter into a store we have around here called record exchange. You can by/trade new or used games, cd's, ALBUMS. My daughter had know idea what they were...ugh! Had to explain the whole kneedle and penny trick. It's hell getting old.

theflash
06-06-2006, 02:44 PM
Excuse me Mr. Nelson..but did you just use the word ALBUM. :laugh: I took my oldest daughter into a store we have around here called record exchange. You can by/trade new or used games, cd's, ALBUMS. My daughter had know idea what they were...ugh! Had to explain the whole kneedle and penny trick. It's hell getting old.

lol if my kid didn't like rap, he would have no idea what a record was. as it is i had to explain to him that no, they weren't invented to make those cool scratch noises. yeesh.

MrGranger
06-06-2006, 03:45 PM
Ya know... Every once in awhile, you're immensely quotable, Shawn ;)

LOL...thanks, that means a lot coming from you. :happy:

Richard, did you take 10 years off completely from writing anything or was it more of a break from the business? I wrote professionally for more than a decade as my day job...then realized that I needed a break. I didn't feel creative anymore, I was a writing machine. During my hiatus I didn't stop writing, just stopped trying to pimp myself as a writer. I got a new day job and started writing at night, took a year off of that to study writing full time, then went back to the day job and again now write on my off hours. When I came back after a 5 year break, I had a new focus and sweet sugar daddy. If I had completely stopped writing then I doubt I'd be at the same place I am today. Did you go cold turkey? Writing checks don't count.

Shawn

Scott Story
06-06-2006, 06:05 PM
3. If you have trouble making yourself write, then you may not be ready. Come back in ten or so years, when you really want it.

Seems that few agree with me on this, which is cool. My point is that anyone who really wants to be a writer and walks away from it just could not stay away long without being very frustrated. Writers just have to write. I've never had success as a writer, and yet I just can't ever let it go--I have to write stories, or I'll go crazy!

On the flip side (another Album reference), I hate to see people throw their lives away on something they just don't get. Yes, it is their lives, and it's well within their rights to spend it that way, but I can't help but think that if they just relaxed and did what came natural they would be happier. Who am I to talk, though?

So, I both stand by and qualify my earlier comment.

Ron Phillips
06-06-2006, 06:29 PM
1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?

I think once your muse has hit, there isn't anyplace you can't write. Generally to get started I work in my office with only the sound of my keyboard. Sadly sometimes that too is silent. :(

2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work

Sleep. My dreams are vivid most mornings, sometimes in the middle of the night, and if they are interesting I will jot a note down. A lot of times I will let the story develop in my head, losing myself in potential of the dreams/stories during down times like driving, walking during lunch, and the ever effective bathroom break.

A lot of my dreams stem from things I see on TV or read in the paper or online. Nuggets that I didn't even give a second thought at the time.

Of course, I've let more potential stories slip away because I often think on them before jotting notes down

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?

Just like others have mentioned. If you really can't focus on the task, take a break. Like R. Nelson, I was going to write my first novel by 25, but life was just too much at the time and found myself taking a long break. I think it was for the better. I've experienced life, managed to find a nice living that writing is now for me and not something that I desperately need to make a career. The whole starving artist thing just wasn't for me.

Of course there is a difference between writing comics and books. There seems to be a roof for the entry level for writers in comics, but many many book writers start as a second career in their 40-60s, some even well after retirement age.

But there are always exceptions.

r nelson
06-06-2006, 07:00 PM
Excuse me Mr. Nelson..but did you just use the word ALBUM. I did!! In fact, I sat there for a minute trying to figure out what to call it. See, I don't listen to CD's, as I've got all my music on the hard drive, but I listen to them in groups that would make up a CD or record or... album.

Richard, did you take 10 years off completely from writing anything or was it more of a break from the business? I never really stopped writing completely, but I stopped trying to write for a market. When I did write (which was rare) I wrote for myself with no intention of trying to get it published, or even caring if it was ever read. It was more of a meditative exercise, if you will.

A few years ago, a friend of mine pretty much dared me to write a comic, and when I did (it was crap, and I had a lot of cobwebs to clear), I realized how much I missed the comic format.

My point is that anyone who really wants to be a writer and walks away from it just could not stay away long without being very frustrated. Writers just have to write. I've never had success as a writer, and yet I just can't ever let it go--I have to write stories, or I'll go crazy! Quitting writing completely would drive me nuts as well. I think when writers get "blocks" though, a lot of it is because they're so driven to succeed at writing that they forget why the act of writing is so important to them on a personal level -- which is how "sort of quitting" helped me out so much in the long run.

- Richard

j giar
06-06-2006, 07:18 PM
All right! Since we're on the subject, I have a question for all you writers out there. I have always loved to read. From elementary school... on. Yes, as a kid and growing up I read comics. But most of what I read were books. My first year of art school I took a creative writing class and it instantly became one of my favorites. Fast forward a couple of years. I begin my quest to become a sequential artist. After one published work and several close calls I took a 5-6 year break. During the time I was still working on comics...I always worked with a writer. I always felt I couldn't handle the task of plotting, characterization and realistic, intelligent dialogue. But some how, when I returned to the medium. Not only did I have my own story I wanted to tell, I had a genuine need..a desire to learn. So my question to you writers...Is it possible for a person, with a dash of creativity, to not only learn to write but to know how to write. With no formal training or previous experience. I know guys like Mcfarlane, Miller, Eisner and many others were not formally trained writers but they picked up on the craft of story telling.

MrGranger
06-06-2006, 08:14 PM
So my question to you writers...Is it possible for a person, with a dash of creativity, to not only learn to write but to know how to write. With no formal training or previous experience.

Yes, of course. Writing doesn't require a degree, very few professions actually do. But I think you've got to learn the craft somewhere. They might not have had formal schooling but I bet there isn't a writer alive or dead who didn't pick up a "How To Write" book or a craft of storytelling book. Plus they hang out with other writers discussing their work, learning from each other. I don't believe that there is any spell you can cast to magically become a writer, but maybe there is?

Shishio
06-06-2006, 09:38 PM
1. I write in the same room my computer is located. (Presently my living room.)

2. I guess I'm inspired by great stories and my desire to write great stories.

3. I don't know if it qualifies as advice, but I'll tell you what I did. I have always had writer's block, which I have spoken about at length here before (http://www.digitalwebbing.com/forums/showthread.php?t=91721&highlight=jigsaw+puzzle+dilemma).

But one day, I got an idea to write a comic based on my life. There are some people (I don't really know them, so I can't call them friends.) that I talk to over the internet once in awhile. I used to chat with them on IRC a lot. There is also a messageboard we all frequent and there is one thread there in which humorous quotes from our IRC channel are posted.

I noticed a number of things I said were deemed worthy enough of being added to this collection, and when I expressed my surprise to this, one person said "but you say the greatest lines."

At the time, I agreed with her. I thought "You know, I do say the greatest lines." (I now know the truth, but let's not get into that.) And so, One-liners (http://www.one-liners.net) was born. (And yes, I know my lettering is shit.)

The great thing about One-liners is that because it's based on true stories, it's so easy to write. I don't have to worry about making up characters or environments, or research, or how to make things believeable, or my eternal nemesis, writer's block. I just transcribe events from my life that I think might be funny as best as I can remember them. I would say it's 95% factual.

And maybe, just maybe, writing it will give me more discipline, which will help me to write other stories.

J Giar: I think reading novels is the best way to learn the craft of writing, so you're probably further along than you think.

Good luck to both of you.

Ron Phillips
06-06-2006, 11:42 PM
I believe writing is like many other skills, artistic or not, there has to be a base talent that you can cultivate and grow. If you don't have the base it really doesn't matter how many words you write, you won't have the skill to be a professional writer.

Professional or not, there are two things that you must do in order to be a writer.

Read
Write


Reading teaches you a various number of things from pacing to characterization, but more importantly it lets you understand your market.

Writing is pretty self-explainatory. You can hardly call yourself a writer if you don't dedicate yourself to the task of writing.

I often times find myself lacking in the second qualifyer, so I probably shouldn't be giving my opinions on the matter. I do know that every writer I've read speak on the subject almost always stress the importance of reading. They could just be to sell more books.

My cousin is a prime example of why it's necessary to be a reader as well as a writer. He has labored for a decade on a novel that is closing in on 1000 pages. I can't get past the first 10 pages. If it's not the illegible names, it's the long expositions on the science of his world. It's impossible to read let alone understand. He has never read a book that was not required in a course of study, and he admits it. I've tried to explain to him what I do know about writing and given him many books on the subject of science fiction writing. But what can you do?

Buckyrig
06-06-2006, 11:51 PM
I believe writing is like many other skills, artistic or not, there has to be a base talent that you can cultivate and grow. If you don't have the base it really doesn't matter how many words you write, you won't have the skill to be a professional writer.

Maybe...

I'm not sure I agree. There may be a limit to how good one can get, but I believe, with effort, anyone can write (or draw). I just think different people have different proclivities and affinities.

Ron Phillips
06-07-2006, 12:01 AM
Well, I think the two opinions overlap. Without the root talent, all the hard work and effort won't take you to the same level as someone who is naturally gifted.

I do agree that with effort anyone can become technically proficient at a skill.

Buckyrig
06-07-2006, 12:13 AM
Without the root talent, all the hard work and effort won't take you to the same level as someone who is naturally gifted..

Ok, that's reasonable.

Without tearing this off on a huge tangent, the question becomes what creates this root? I would be doubtful it is anything inborn. So, would it then be possible to cultivate an environment for oneself that is condicive to developing talent?

Ron Phillips
06-07-2006, 12:25 AM
Why couldn't it be an inborn talent? A disposition to be more perceptive in one way or another?

Buckyrig
06-07-2006, 12:39 AM
Cuz it's a cop-out explanation in my opinion.

(It could be true...what do I know. But I think it is based on people being mystified by those who do what they cannot.)

I honestly believe anyone of average intelligence/skill can learn to do just about anything...write, draw, sing, calculus, carpentry. Just a matter of what is encouraged, study, focus, and approach (Not everyone responds the same way to the same stimuli).

I've always liked this as well...
Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up. - Picasso

j giar
06-07-2006, 01:25 AM
Our first year of art school we sat through this assembly. The dean of our school, this small little italian guy....can't rememeber his name after all these years. Anyways, we sat through this really inspirational speech about how when all of us were growing up and other kids thought we were weird or different..we were. We were born with a gift. He went on to say that everyone is born with artistic talent in one form or another. It's just as we grow and mature some of us never stop listening to the voice. However, most of us follow the many things in life that alter or redirect that voice or maybe even stifle or extinguish it all together. Yeah, I know it's rather corny and romanticized. But I do believe it for the most part.

Lovecraft13
06-07-2006, 02:10 PM
So I ask everyone the following:

1.Where do you write? The environment. Do you listen to music, watch TV, or is it in a quiet place?

2.What inspires you or motivates your brain to work

3.Any suggestions on my conundrum?


1) I spend most of my free time writing first drafts in various bookstores and cafes with my laptop or just a legal pad. I do like to people-watch as I write, but I don't like the distracting noise associated with public places. So I am never without my I-pod.

When it comes to finalizing a script, I need the privacy and silence of my room. Music is a no-no because it tends to mess up the meter of my dialogue.

2) Myself.

3) "Writer's block" doesn't really exist. It is a discipline issue. A person doesn't need to draft up an epic every time he or she sits down to write. A person can establish a goal to accomplish, no matter how minute it may seem. If a writer only managed to scribble a few ideas down for a story, that's okay. Those few ideas will eventually build into plots, then into plot breakdowns, issue breakdowns, then page-by-page breakdowns. Just keep working.