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BillNichols
06-13-2006, 04:41 PM
I'm doing something for the magazine and I'd like to know: What would you ask an editor? About the job he or she does? The decision he or she makes? What?

j giar
06-13-2006, 06:05 PM
Hey Bill how about some of these. How do they make their decisions? How do they decide creative teams? How do they decide what's a good story and what is not. In the past, how did they come up with or decide the direction of any given series or characters. What do they do in their spare time. Do they get creative block? And if so how do they over come it. Do they do anything during their creative brainstorming. I.e, chew on a pencil, spin aroound in their chair( I do this one.), listen to music. How do they manage an entire creative team. What are the ins and outs of dealing with many different personalities, in a creative group..... Anyone else?

BillNichols
06-13-2006, 08:53 PM
That's exactly the kind of feedback I'm wanting on this!

Ingrid K. V. Hardy
06-14-2006, 09:19 AM
Pretty much what J said. How do they arrive at the decisions they make? Do they prefer working with people they already know? How do they find new people? What do they do with people that cause them problems or teams that don't get along? What do they think about groups that are located in different areas, ie getting everyone to communicate regularly and the like. Do they like chocolate? No, no, just kidding on that one.... :)

innocentboy
06-14-2006, 10:18 AM
just wanted to big up Sketch Magazine. haven't seen in a while, guessing my LCS doesn't carry it no more, but was loving it when it was coming out.

very aspiring creator friendly magazine

jrod
06-14-2006, 10:19 AM
I recently got an email from someone who was trying out comic editing and wanted to talk to me a bit about it. I told him to give me a call. He starts the conversations by saying, This is so weird. I usually do comic stuff over email. I questioned him further and hes worked on three small projects and everyone of them hes never talked to the person hes editing over the phone it was always email or IM. I thought that was nuts.

So Id certainly ask how he communicates with his team.

innocentboy
06-14-2006, 10:20 AM
remember when i first discovered it, was bigging it up and Alex Maleev himself even chimed in and gave some kudos to the mag

BillNichols
06-14-2006, 03:06 PM
Thanks very much for the nice words about Sketch Magazine. As you can tell, we're still putting it out (now back on schedule even!) Check it out sometime when you get the chance. www.bluelinepro.com (http://www.bluelinepro.com)

BillNichols
06-14-2006, 03:08 PM
Tell me more. I'm interested in how that works for him.

Shishio
06-14-2006, 03:56 PM
...and everyone of them he’s never talked to the person he’s editing over the phone – it was always email or IM. I thought that was nuts.


Why?

dano
06-14-2006, 04:03 PM
Is there any requirement for them to have art director experience/education since they work so heavily with art and choosing artists?

Poboy
06-14-2006, 04:18 PM
How do they choose an artist - is it just 'like it/don't like it', or, would they choose someone who's work the don't personally like if it met whatever other criteria they have?

j giar
06-14-2006, 05:46 PM
Bill, not to get to far off subject. Can we order Sketch directly thru blueline?
Thanks, Jim Giar

DungeonMasterJm
06-14-2006, 06:18 PM
I would love to hear what a typical day is for an editor - pretty much their general duties. Do they play phone tag between creators? If the artist and writer don't agree on something does the editor make the final decision? Do they handle contract singings at all?

If the editor needs a book out in 2 or 3 weeks because a creator backs out last minute who do they go with to get the book completed? A friend? A friend of a friend?

Do they ever read comic book forums?

What do they take home with them from a con? (The reason I'm asking this is because I'm certain that I saw Erik Larsen say that he doesn't take comic porposals home from cons because he has too much other stuff to carry home.)


DM Jim

jrod
06-14-2006, 06:37 PM
Why?

I guess you can say its a matter of preference but to really edit not just proof read you need to get into it pretty deep with the artists. A lot of times, with electronic notes, theyre either confused or not fully realized or the writer/artist doesnt understand why you want to make the change. It can lead to a sloppy final product. Plus, a lot of times by actually talking and explaining over the phone, the end result will be even better than either of you intended.

Personal preference electronic notes, phone call, repeat. It allows both sides to collect their thoughts.

I guess I dont like AIM because most people type faster than me. If Im editing thats not a good situation. It ends up with both sides sort of talking over each other and my side getting drowned out.

Anyway, Bill, the guy who wrote me was just doing some pitch work for the most part, tagging along with folks who were trying to get their books picked up by Image and what not. So its not to say his technique was really working, but I certainly told him to at least try phone calls insist on them if he must. He said he will.

Its just a more efficient process, less back and forth. My coeditor for POSTCARDS and I talk at least twice week and Ive called each of the 30 guys involved in the book multiple times (Except one guy whos in England I should really get international calls put on my phone, though). Its usually five minutes and were both on the same exact page.

I think the internet and track changes in Word have made people slack off the craft a bit.

BillNichols
06-14-2006, 06:54 PM
Those are some good posts, guys!

BillNichols
06-14-2006, 06:55 PM
Yeah, you can order the magazine at www.bluelinepro.com (http://www.bluelinepro.com)!

Poboy
06-14-2006, 07:11 PM
(Except one guy whos in England I should really get international calls put on my phone, though). Its usually five minutes and were both on the same exact page.
Sign up (and get him to) on Skype. Then you can talk to him for free.

innocentboy
06-14-2006, 07:51 PM
Thanks very much for the nice words about Sketch Magazine. As you can tell, we're still putting it out (now back on schedule even!) Check it out sometime when you get the chance. www.bluelinepro.com (http://www.bluelinepro.com)
no need to thank me, just giving credit where credit is due!
:har:

it's a great magazine though, for real

jrod
06-14-2006, 08:12 PM
Sign up (and get him to) on Skype. Then you can talk to him for free.

I'll just call him when I really need to talk to him - I hate making people install software. Gotta make it as easy as possible, you know. I keep international calling cards handy.

Just to wrap this up Harvey Pekar is in POSTCARDS, I got to work with him he didnt even have email or IM or anything. He would call me now and again, go over his story. When he was done he called me up and read it to me. I gave him notes and hed be on the other end writing it down. When the story was finished he snail-mailed it to Matt Kindt, followed up with a phone call and went over the layouts with him. I called Matt to make sure hes straight. Snail-mailed a thank you letter to Harvey that doubled as an invite to dinner the weekend I was in Cleveland (he was in Chicago, unfortunately).

Thats old school, right there. And the story's looking great - all of his stories come out great.

Tom Nguyen
06-17-2006, 12:17 AM
Hi Bill! What's going on? Been a while since seeing ya on the Inkwell boards. Here's a funny question:
How the hell do the editors have the power to hire artistic talent when most of them are not artistically literate (have poor visual assessment)?

:D

Best,
TOM

jrod
06-17-2006, 12:56 AM
Hi Bill! What's going on? Been a while since seeing ya on the Inkwell boards. Here's a funny question:
How the hell do the editors have the power to hire artistic talent when most of them are not artistically literate (have poor visual assessment)?

:D

Best,
TOM

We never ask questions. Everything's a statement. You do that enough and people start to think you know what you're talking about. ;)

Tom Nguyen
06-17-2006, 01:02 AM
We never ask questions. Everything's a statement. You do that enough and people start to think you know what you're talking about. ;)

Ha! :P Love your sense of humor!

Best!
Tom

BillNichols
06-17-2006, 05:42 AM
Good to "see" you! Good question, too, and one of several I'm going to pose to a few editors who've said they'd do it and put all that in Sketch Magazine. I'm still looking for editors...I need a DC editor or two...

Steve Colle
06-17-2006, 08:30 AM
Being a freelance editor, I wouldn't mind seeing an article that: 1) identifies our role, 2) describes the pros and cons of hiring an outside editor, and 3) identifies the trials and rewards both the creators and the editor get out of the project and relationship. There's a lot more to it than simply proofreading. ;) Also, it seems to be a direction that many creators are going in themselves, with the number of freelancers growing every day. What kind of training or experience should they have in order to make those judgment calls? Also, can freelance work lead to regular work with a small or recognized publisher? Just some different directions to take the article. You've got the market for it, that's for sure, and you've got many freelancers on this board alone to start the interview process from.

I'll be one of the first to purchase any issues with regards to editing, freelance or otherwise. It's a process that lies invisible to the reader, just as it should, but it's also one of the most misunderstood.

BillNichols
06-17-2006, 09:00 AM
Good post. Really. And I'll let you know when that issue comes out!

DungeonMasterJm
06-17-2006, 12:21 PM
Almost forgot this question - how does one go about getting a job as an editor?

DM Jim

innocentboy
06-17-2006, 05:10 PM
maybe some pics would be cool ... it's all nice and sometimes surprising seeing what all these behind-the-scenes people look like :)

BillNichols
06-18-2006, 07:18 PM
Thanks for all the good feedback. This has been one of the more active threads I've started with the Sketch Magazine slant!

DungeonMasterJm
06-19-2006, 08:07 AM
Got another question about editors but it's kind of goofy. How do they dress? I guess this would apply more towards an editor that works at an office as opposed to say out of their house or something.

Do they wear ties and go with a professional look? A collared shirt and maybe some Dockers? Polo shirts and jeans?

Obviously not a hard hitting question but I was just wondering. I guess I would almost feel kinda stupid if I went to meet an editor and I'm dressed all professionally in a suit and tie and the person I'm meeting wears a pull-over shirt and jeans.

Thanks.

DM Jim

BillNichols
06-19-2006, 03:38 PM
I think the question's valid...

BillNichols
06-22-2006, 04:35 AM
Right now I have a set of questions that I'll putting out to whatever editors I can get e-mail addresses to, seeing what responses I get and put that all together. This could end up being a separate issue or magazine...the first in a series! Bill Nichols' Comic Book Q & A: The Editor or something... I dunno, we'll see what happens.

BillNichols
06-27-2006, 04:36 AM
Hey, if anybody has an editor's e-mail, drop it to me offlist. I esp. need Marvel editors, heck even Archie Comics, although I have a couple, but ANY other address you might have, send it to me. I'm doing this feature on comics editors and I'm just about ready to roll with it...



Thanks,

BillNichols
06-28-2006, 05:06 AM
Forget the addresses. Now I just need the names of editors on various books for whatever companies you come with. How's that?

BillNichols
09-02-2006, 12:34 PM
Okay, at this point, I have over a dozen of the Q & A's back from the various editors and there are a few more coming, ranging from Chris Warner at Dark Horse to John Barber at Marvel, plus a few others.

Some of the answers are quite informative, some short, but overall, I'm pleased with the result so far.

Any last minute questions? Any thoughts on the editing process or the editors themselves?

If anthing occurs to you, just post it or drop me a line!

Ingrid K. V. Hardy
09-02-2006, 01:41 PM
This must have been mentioned before, but just in case... What about the types of stories looked for in the future? Emphasis on superheroes, or to keep expanding, with different subjects? You know, history, speculative.....as well as SF and all that....?

BillNichols
09-02-2006, 01:56 PM
Good point. Some editors would probably say that if you were aware of the what books they, esp. the Big Ones, then you should gear your stuff toward that.

However, a Great Story is a Good Story. Same with Great Artwork. And who knows what can happen when you combine both.

Some look at the bottom line, in the business sense, so that might factor into it as well.

jrod
09-02-2006, 03:07 PM
Good point. Some editors would probably say that if you were aware of the what books they, esp. the Big Ones, then you should gear your stuff toward that.

However, a Great Story is a Good Story. Same with Great Artwork. And who knows what can happen when you combine both.

Some look at the bottom line, in the business sense, so that might factor into it as well.

Book publishers getting involved makes it so you can take risks on content and sell your ass off - book publishers are looking for the next big thing. I've been able to work closely with the acquiring editor at Random House - I'd introduce him to artists I met at conventions with a single self published book and he's interested in hearing pitches. Names don't matter and the more original the content the better. And they're paying for them. Good money, too.

Ingrid K. V. Hardy
09-03-2006, 09:04 AM
Book publishers getting involved makes it so you can take risks on content and sell your ass off - book publishers are looking for the next big thing. I've been able to work closely with the acquiring editor at Random House - I'd introduce him to artists I met at conventions with a single self published book and he's interested in hearing pitches. Names don't matter and the more original the content the better. And they're paying for them. Good money, too.

I hope I'm not derailing the topic here. You brought up a point that intriques me since I have been here at DW, and that's conventions. There are no conventions up here! The closest are a 7-8 hour drive away, and that is simply not in the budjet. From what the majority of people mention here, the way to go is conventions. Will editors truly consider people outside the convention circuit? Do you really have to know someone who does the convention circuit to be considered by an editor? What are the other serious options editors look at? If someone wanted to be part of a team, it must be next to impossible to get attention going the mail route.... and editors must be flooded with submissions and other things to do...

jrod
09-03-2006, 11:48 AM
I hope I'm not derailing the topic here. You brought up a point that intriques me since I have been here at DW, and that's conventions. There are no conventions up here! The closest are a 7-8 hour drive away, and that is simply not in the budjet. From what the majority of people mention here, the way to go is conventions. Will editors truly consider people outside the convention circuit? Do you really have to know someone who does the convention circuit to be considered by an editor? What are the other serious options editors look at? If someone wanted to be part of a team, it must be next to impossible to get attention going the mail route.... and editors must be flooded with submissions and other things to do...

I don't think so, as long as your talented and know how to network a bit and don't come off like a dink. Obviously you need some books under your belt for Marvel and DC and what not but there are plenty of small publishers that can help you get those books.