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View Full Version : What to put on business cards?


the other mike
07-04-2006, 02:49 AM
i know the question sounds like a no-brainer, but i'll ask it anyway:
what info besides, name and e-mail do you put on business cards?
i'm printing up a bunch for SD and i wanna be sure i put all pertinent info on the cards. i don't wanna get stuck with 100 useless pieces of paper.
anyway, i work from home and don't have a cell, so would i have to put my home address and home phone? or will e-mail and web address be ok? i've seen some pros cards have only e-mail and a home page addy. i don't want to crowd the card with useless info.

The Anti-crest
07-04-2006, 03:05 AM
Name
What you do
who you do it for(company name if applicable)
contact info(phone number, email)

Mecha
07-04-2006, 03:44 AM
I wouldn't suggest your phone number.... here's why: Talking to a comic book collector last month, I didn't have a card of my own and borrowed one from my animator friend.... she's since gotten phone calls from three different people asking for me or her because they thought we were cute, two of which we hadn't even met. It was creepy.

Email is a fine way for people to get ahold of you, or simply have your number on your site, which should be on the card as well, so if they look at the site and want to contact you that way, it's doable.

I recommend only putting company name if you know you'll be working for them for a long time too, or if it's your own company. Name, what you do, email, and website URL are most important and you won't have to worry about getting new cards :D

Gonzogoose
07-04-2006, 04:15 AM
I agree with Mecha with one difference. IF you had a separate business line I'd say put that on there, but I wouldn't put your home phone personally speaking. Name, email, web address and what you do are the main things. Maybe a small logo if appropriate to pretty ut up, but not really necessary. That's about it.

The Anti-crest
07-04-2006, 03:06 PM
I've worked with tons of musicians who all put their cell phones on their buisness card.

Gonzogoose and Mecha are very much on point though. The idea is to let them know who you are and how easy it is to get in touch with you.

the other mike
07-04-2006, 03:26 PM
thanks very much, guys. i would've put my addy and phone number if i never got a confirmation. last thing i need is for a stranger to call at 2am offering to comb my hair for me.

Boy
07-04-2006, 06:48 PM
I dunno, Mike. A free hair combing IS nice.


Seriously though. A photo might not be a bad idea. If you plan to use these for cons, anyways. Editors get a LOT of cards. And if you actually manage to talk to them, they probably won't remember your name, but they're much more likely to remember your face.

fluxchild
07-04-2006, 07:54 PM
I wouldn't put a home number on my card unless I didn't have a business card...I do graphic design which means I do a ton of business cards...the info most likely to be added is

Name
title(or what you do)

address(if pertinent to contacting you)
phone numbers(most people put home, mobile, and fax)

JSettnek
07-04-2006, 10:29 PM
I think a phone number should be on a business card. People don't want have to track you down to give you work. You should make it easy for them. But at the same time you don't want to give out business cards to every person you meet unless you expect them to contact you at some point.
But if you are uncomfortable printing a number on your card you could just leave the area blank and then use the pen you carry, when you network, to write it on there.

To go with that here's a neat little trick I learned from some strange scientist guy in a book store.

This guy saw me looking at computer books and we got to talking about what we do. When he gave me his card he wrote on the back where we had met and what we were talking about. Six months later when I was cleaning out my wallet of strange business cards I kept this one because I remembered the guy and our conversation. I even took a minute to look at his website. Imagine if I were an editor and he were an artist or writer and I needed to hire someone. This would have been a perfect setup for the guy to get a job.

jrod
07-04-2006, 10:40 PM
We had a pretty detailed discussion on business cards here (http://popcultureshock.com/pcs/forums/t10922-business-cards.html) and there are a lot of examples posted of cards people are using.

Design is most important, I'd think, and it should have your name, phone number, email and website. Here's my most recent one:

Front:
http://www.jasonrodriguez.com/JasonBusinessCardFront.jpg
Back:
http://www.jasonrodriguez.com/JasonBusinessCardBack.jpg

And my older one (I've since decided to lose the address):

Front:
http://www.jasonrodriguez.com/BCFront.jpg
Back:
http://www.jasonrodriguez.com/BCBack.jpg

jrod
07-04-2006, 10:42 PM
On the phone number issue, I put my cell phone. It's crazy not to have a phone number. When I was putting together Postcards I was calling people up, not sending them emails, because you get answers faster. People tend to lose emails.

If you don't want people calling you up, don't give your card to them.

fluxchild
07-05-2006, 12:19 AM
if you're weird about putting a number on your card, why not make it into sort of a little flyer with an email address or a web addy on it? Then it could be sort of a teaser flyer or preview of your work....but bear in mind that the dimensions of a bcard is only 3.5 X 2......it may be 3.5 X 2.5, not positive....been drinkin!

the other mike
07-05-2006, 12:26 AM
so to review, its DEFINITELY...
name
what you do
e-mail
web address
...and phone (if its a cell or business phone)

do not put home phone or home address.

another no-brainer question:
in the job title part, i always put "illustrator". do i need to get specific and say "penciller"? or "comic book illustrator" or "comic book artist"? or do i go the humorous route like "drawer" or "crap flinger"?

jrod
07-05-2006, 12:40 AM
so to review, its DEFINITELY...
name
what you do
e-mail
web address
...and phone (if its a cell or business phone)

do not put home phone or home address.

another no-brainer question:
in the job title part, i always put "illustrator". do i need to get specific and say "penciller"? or "comic book illustrator" or "comic book artist"? or do i go the humorous route like "drawer" or "crap flinger"?

You should leave some blank, uncoated space for notes, too. Some people will want to jot down what books you do or maybe you have an alternate phone number for them or something - at a convention and you want to meet up with someone, cell's dead and you need to use your lady's phone, who knows?


And take yourself seriously. You're an illustrator.

the other mike
07-05-2006, 02:24 AM
You should leave some blank, uncoated space for notes, too. Some people will want to jot down what books you do or maybe you have an alternate phone number for them or something - at a convention and you want to meet up with someone, cell's dead and you need to use your lady's phone, who knows?


And take yourself seriously. You're an illustrator.

illustrator it is.

just for the record, i'm going to make/print the cards myself. not trying to be cheap tho, i just don't want to get stuck with a few hundred of the things AGAIN. plus i had a bad experience dealing with vistaprint. ironically, making my own is more expensive than having them printed. its $20 for paper and card making software vs $5-$10 for shipping the free business cards over at vistaprint.

T.J. May
07-05-2006, 08:07 AM
I met a writer at the NYC-Comicon in Feb that also listed the four credits he is best known for, in addition to his contact info.

It was a pretty cool idea, particuarly when your card can get tossed in a pile of other peoples. This idea would really separate a published creator.

My best
T

jrod
07-05-2006, 08:49 AM
illustrator it is.

just for the record, i'm going to make/print the cards myself. not trying to be cheap tho, i just don't want to get stuck with a few hundred of the things AGAIN. plus i had a bad experience dealing with vistaprint. ironically, making my own is more expensive than having them printed. its $20 for paper and card making software vs $5-$10 for shipping the free business cards over at vistaprint.

I use overnightprints.com - but, yeah, when you buy and make your own you can switch it up more often.

jrod
07-05-2006, 08:59 AM
I met a writer at the NYC-Comicon in Feb that also listed the four credits he is best known for, in addition to his contact info.

It was a pretty cool idea, particuarly when your card can get tossed in a pile of other peoples. This idea would really separate a published creator.

My best
T

That could work if the stuff you're best known for is well known, comes from a major studio not represented on your card, or is award winning or nominated. "XYZ, Author of the Ignatz Nominated ZYX" or "XYZ, author of ZYX (Image Comics), YXZ (Dark Horse)". It reminds people that you're important. Otherwise you're just reminding people you make books that they've never heard of and it'll just take up space and make the card look cluttered, I'd think. Blank space to let people jot their own notes, including book titles, is a more dynamic way to take care of the credits issue.

T.J. May
07-05-2006, 02:12 PM
Right, this guy worked on some ver yrecognizable Marvel characters and others. But, he's probably just a step or two above most of the writers on these boards. Ya know? Got a few breaks, but isn't in the Bendisphere.
:)

Dannthr
07-05-2006, 03:03 PM
Just have your name, those are the best.

jrod
07-05-2006, 03:42 PM
Just have your name, those are the best.

That's almost as silly as having an official site in your signature that requires a username and password to get into. :p

jrod
07-05-2006, 03:54 PM
Right, this guy worked on some ver yrecognizable Marvel characters and others. But, he's probably just a step or two above most of the writers on these boards. Ya know? Got a few breaks, but isn't in the Bendisphere.
:)

I'm not putting anyone down on these boards - I think we're all making great stuff. But just to tell a story that illustrates where I was coming from.

Really popular indie writer for a very popular indie company. Been around for years. Sells well, great bookstore penetration, dedicated fanbase. Gets a call one day from an editor at a big-two publisher. Big-two tells the guy, ďHey I was reading [low-print novel the guy wrote] and was wondering if you ever considered making comics.Ē

Popular indie writer was shocked, said, ďHave you ever heard of ______ and ______ and _______.Ē Big-two had no idea. He didn't push it because he wanted the cash. So, all Iím saying is, a lot of the people who should be paying attention really arenít.

So you need to dress up the credits as best you can and keep in mind that the higher up an editor is, the more handholding he or she needs. That's all. Even if it means taking a quote from a review written about one of your books from a well-known site.

"T.J. May is one to watch."
-Newsarama

Something like that. I don't know, maybe on the back of the card.

Ron Phillips
07-05-2006, 03:55 PM
Right, this guy worked on some ver yrecognizable Marvel characters and others. But, he's probably just a step or two above most of the writers on these boards. Ya know? Got a few breaks, but isn't in the Bendisphere.
:)

Bendisphere? That's too funny.

I remember when Bendis was a real person. Of course back than he was 7'8", every deal he made with Old Scratch they took off an inch. So I guess that was 4 feet ago. :rolleyes:

I bought this Goldfish page off of him. I remember he asked me if I wanted it signed. I'm not in to the signing stuff, but said sure. He signed it with a sharpie over his B&W artwork. Classic.

Most classic line my wife ever said at a con. MOC 2003, freezing cold. Bendis comes out with a ski jacket and shorts and says, "Man it's cold", my wife's response, "Dumb ass." :laugh:

Sorry, we were talking about business cards.

I was told once it is always good to have two sets of cards. One with limited information and one with full contact information. I guess the limited info was to lead people to your site and the full was for publishers or business contacts.

the other mike
07-06-2006, 02:26 AM
ok here it is:
http://home.comcast.net/~theothermike/images/card1.JPG

i know its not the prettiest or the most original, but it was relatively easy to make and i hope it gets the job done. its blue because i want it to look like comic book pencils and because its better than plain ol' black. i woulda put it in a "panel" to further make it look like a pencilled page but it comes out from my printer askew for some reason.
i wanted something simple and neat and easy to make with a little something to give it a (very) little zing.

-mike

jrod
07-06-2006, 09:56 AM
That's not bad. I do have two pieces of advise, though, and neither of them are huge.

1) The email is easy to mess up with that period before the "d". At least for me it is, the next to last letter and I kind of breezed over the punctuation there. Do all gmails need something-dot-something-at-gmail.com? I could have sworn Iíve seen some without that.

2) Iím assuming you get Comcast web-space for free and thatís fine. Use it if you got it. But to come across as professional with an easy-to-remember web address Iíd consider going to GoDaddy.com, buying a domain name for nine bucks a year, itís cheap, and forwarding it to your Comcast web-space. GoDaddy has free web-parking and domain forwarding when you buy your domain there.

Just two things to make it come across like youíve been doing this for a while.

the other mike
07-06-2006, 02:38 PM
1- somebody already took "theothermike" over at gmail (bastards). i didn't want to switch to anything else since i was, and have been using, "theothermike" since the early years of the internet (god now i feel old). but yeah, that ".d" is distracting. but my gmail addy is my "go anywhere" email acct. my only other e-mail is the catchier theothermike@comcast.net, but who knows how long i'll stay with them...

2- 10 bucks, huh? i will definitely look into it. might not be in time for san diego, tho.

T.J. May
07-07-2006, 09:05 AM
"T.J. May is one to watch."
-Newsarama



That is so true. :har:

I'm adding that to my business card.

Janto
07-07-2006, 12:09 PM
I would say any illustrator should include a small piece of their work on their card, what depends on what you do, but I do all these cards for accountants and solicitors and all they want is conservative text. Maybe you don't want to be too kooky, but personality goes a long way.

remember - if you can lay out a comic, you can lay out a business card!

joshm
07-12-2006, 01:34 PM
I just did my first business card, so I wanted to see what people think of it. The image doesn't look like me, so it may not be appropriate. I can put any number if images in there, but I kind of like this image.

http://www.comicbookculture.com/avatar/business-card.jpg

Caleb Monroe
07-12-2006, 02:36 PM
Josh,

It looks nice, but is VERY busy. I would simplify it, maybe take out the snail-mail. As it is now, the eye doesn't really know what to focus on...and what you want it to focus on is your name.

And if you have time to do a self-portrait for the left side between now and then, it certaily wouldn't hurt.

joshm
07-12-2006, 02:43 PM
Belacaleb, thanks for the advice. I'm going to do a self portrait while I'm at work and then I'll put it in there when I get home. Shouldn't take me long. You're right about the snail mail, which I put in there because of a sample I found on line. I figure calling me and emailing me are pretty much the only things they'll need. Perhaps I should put it on the back, as I'm printing these at home, so it won't be all the difficult to do.

Josh

danz23
07-12-2006, 06:38 PM
I've been for over a week, and I didn't see this Thread before...
well, this is the biz Card I got done for SDCC;

http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f144/danz23/Biz_Card_Trevorcopy3.jpg

What do you guys think??
See you at SDCC :)

the other mike
07-13-2006, 06:28 PM
That's not bad. I do have two pieces of advise, though, and neither of them are huge.

1) The email is easy to mess up with that period before the "d". At least for me it is, the next to last letter and I kind of breezed over the punctuation there. Do all gmails need something-dot-something-at-gmail.com? I could have sworn Iíve seen some without that.

2) Iím assuming you get Comcast web-space for free and thatís fine. Use it if you got it. But to come across as professional with an easy-to-remember web address Iíd consider going to GoDaddy.com, buying a domain name for nine bucks a year, itís cheap, and forwarding it to your Comcast web-space. GoDaddy has free web-parking and domain forwarding when you buy your domain there.

Just two things to make it come across like youíve been doing this for a while.

well, i've taken the plunge and bought my own domain name. and yep, i registered through godaddybut i was a bit confused with the other fees they tacked onto the 8.99 fee, but i worked it out. i used the forwarding and masking features, and voila. thanks for the advice, jrod.