PDA

View Full Version : POD Question


Awesomus Prime
07-26-2006, 12:49 PM
Not so much interested in whether or not POD is worth while, I understand it has it's ups and downs.

Question is thus, I've been hopping around Ka-Blam's site and I wonder if anyone who's used them knows what kind of binding is used? Are we talking two staple magazine style or soft cover book style binding? Does selecting cardstock make that difference?

Further do any other POD services offer book style binding as opposed to traditional 'magazine style'?

I suspect that the cardstock option gives me a book style cover (ala manga comic book format) but I don't want to make an assumption and then find out I was wrong 200 copies later.

L Jamal
07-26-2006, 12:54 PM
Ka-Blam offer saddle-stitching. That's folded down the middle and stapled.

For perfect (square) bound (glued to a spine like TPBs), there's ComixPress.com, DreamweaverPress.com, and RapidPOD.com. Be sure to do your research as each have their own brand of problems.

eDuke
07-26-2006, 01:00 PM
POD? (http://www.digitalwebbing.com/bloodrayne/BR6_Preview.html) BloodRayne: Plague of Dreams? Cool! ;)

L Jamal
07-26-2006, 01:03 PM
^pimp^

eDuke
07-26-2006, 01:04 PM
My website. My rules. :whistlin:

Paul Sanderson
07-26-2006, 07:22 PM
:laugh: classic.

Lynn Lefey
07-26-2006, 08:09 PM
I just got my books from Ka-Blam, and I'm rather pleased. They are indeed saddle stitched. Paper is of good bright white stock. Cover is glossy, slightly heavier stock.

The only weirdnesses about the book is that you can literally feel the black areas, as they are slightly raised from the print material, and it doesn't smell like a normal comic, since it uses a toner based color instead of printed ink. It's funny that I'd even notice something like that, but the smell of comics is a very old, very loved scent.

Ka-Blam ONLY does saddle-stitched comics right now, but may change that in the future. If you use Ka-Blam, tell them I recommended them, so I get a discount on my next printing! :)

Paul Sanderson
07-26-2006, 08:19 PM
Has anyone here used RapidPOD yet? If so, how do they stack up?

Ron Phillips
07-26-2006, 08:24 PM
I just got my books from Ka-Blam, and I'm rather pleased. They are indeed saddle stitched. Paper is of good bright white stock. Cover is glossy, slightly heavier stock.

The only weirdnesses about the book is that you can literally feel the black areas, as they are slightly raised from the print material, and it doesn't smell like a normal comic, since it uses a toner based color instead of printed ink. It's funny that I'd even notice something like that, but the smell of comics is a very old, very loved scent.

Ka-Blam ONLY does saddle-stitched comics right now, but may change that in the future. If you use Ka-Blam, tell them I recommended them, so I get a discount on my next printing! :)

The raised ink is standard with POD. The process is placing ink on top of the page and not pressing it into the page.

T.J. May
07-27-2006, 12:53 AM
ver book style binding? Does selecting cardstock make that difference?

Further do any other POD services offer book style binding as opposed to traditional 'magazine style'?

I suspect that the cardstock option gives me a book style cover (ala manga comic book format) but I don't want to make an assumption and then find out I was wrong 200 copies later.

The page count effects the binding more than the cover stock. PODs that can perfect bind usually require 80+ pages for perfect binding, and many cannot print on the spine for some reason.

Catching Lucifer's Lunch is 56-pages and perfect bound, with printed spine, but that was done at Quebecor.

L Jamal
07-27-2006, 12:58 AM
Dreamweaver goes down to about 32 pages.
The ability to print on the spine really depends on how thick you spine is.

T.J. May
07-27-2006, 01:02 AM
Dreamweaver goes down to about 32 pages.
The ability to print on the spine really depends on how thick you spine is.

Yeah, I've seen some PODs that won't do spine printing even on the 80 pagers though. Not sure why, Jason has all the answers when it comes to printing.

L Jamal
07-27-2006, 01:22 AM
The usual problem is the shifting. I'm thinking about making a huge 100 page art of Warmageddon tome.

Awesomus Prime
07-27-2006, 07:52 AM
Hmmm.. I want to go with Ka-Blam but I also think perfect binding really just looks better than saddle stiching. Like perfect bound looks more published.

It's funny I've never felt this way BUYING a book but now making one I feel other people buying MY book will feel that way.

T.J. May
07-27-2006, 09:03 AM
Hmmm.. I want to go with Ka-Blam but I also think perfect binding really just looks better than saddle stiching. Like perfect bound looks more published.

Well, we were warned but went ahead and did it anyway. When you get up to a page count that requires perfect binding you are upping the cover price of the book. Catching Lucifer's Lunch is $5.99 which most people that bought the book found it to be well worth it.

But.........

jason and I aren't big enough names yet to get people outside of DW or whom meet us at cons to buy a book with that kind of price tag. Our $3.00 32-page, saddle-stitched books sell like hotcakes. So, we didn't move very many copies due primarily to the cover price. We are now talking with Diamond about reoffering that book at a reduced price just to move stock and get back some cash.

Plus, if you are thinking about the book trade, the word on the street is that you need to have a product of 125+ pages to get the attention of the book distributors. Why? Because they are in love with Manga and want more product that offers there customers more for their money. But again, you'll need to establish a name before doing that.

I don;t know you, so if you've already established a name for yourself than this may not pply to you.

My best
T

Awesomus Prime
07-27-2006, 09:51 AM
Do you think making a name in the provincial theatre scene counts?

I'm starting to think it might be in my best interest to serialize the book in saddle stapled format and collect it later in perfect bound TPB if it's successful. Of course if no one buys the first book none of this matters... and first I have to finish the book...

Buckyrig
07-27-2006, 09:56 AM
A popular idea on the board for experiment has been to do an oversized one-shot to introduce your story and maybe garner interest for a longer volume.

I don't know if anyone has tried this yet and if they have had any success.

L Jamal
07-27-2006, 10:09 AM
The problem with one shots is that no matter the size there is no impetus to read it. It's not a follow up to something you've already read and it's not likely to continuing.

Unless the book is a really good read or features really good art or is really cheap or features someone or somethign that I'm interested in, I'm likely to pass it up. I like the $5 price as I will buy a lot of book in that range and below. Over $5 I begin to think twice.

Buckyrig
07-27-2006, 10:14 AM
The problem with one shots is that no matter the size there is no impetus to read it. It's not a follow up to something you've already read and it's not likely to continuing.

Unless the book is a really good read or features really good art or is really cheap or features someone or somethign that I'm interested in, I'm likely to pass it up. I like the $5 price as I will buy a lot of book in that range and below. Over $5 I begin to think twice.

Well, I mean...waddya gonna do?

Assuming you find the way to market it to get some people to read, you would approach it like Star Wars. There is a plan for a whole arc, but the one-shot can stand alone if it has to.

MrGranger
07-27-2006, 10:36 AM
The ability to print on the spine really depends on how thick you spine is.

Around 80-90 pages makes a spine thick enough. The only way I know to make a spine thick enough is to add pages.

MrGranger
07-27-2006, 10:41 AM
The problem with one shots is that no matter the size there is no impetus to read it. It's not a follow up to something you've already read and it's not likely to continuing.


A book being a one-shot is neither here nor there for me, it doesn't affect my buying. But if it's good then I'm likely to buy more from the creators. And if they do a follow-up series or just another one-shot then I'm likely to buy that. The impetus to read something to me is that it's good. If anything, a continuing series won't compell me to buy if I cannot start from issue #1. There are a lot of series that looked great but were past issue 50 and if I couldn't get the first issues reasonably then I pass. I don't like jumping into series in the middle.

T.J. May
07-27-2006, 01:36 PM
The problem with one shots is that no matter the size there is no impetus to read it. It's not a follow up to something you've already read and it's not likely to continuing.

Unless the book is a really good read or features really good art or is really cheap or features someone or somethign that I'm interested in, I'm likely to pass it up. I like the $5 price as I will buy a lot of book in that range and below. Over $5 I begin to think twice.

All we've done is one-shots and they sell very well at the cons in the $3.00 range. The fact that consumers get a complete story has been or biggest selling point. We find that the majority of readers (not collectors) are sick of the ongoing series format anyway. If they see a story arc they think they'll like, they wait for the trade.

But again, you need the name recoginition and ours is not to the point were a significant number of folks will buy our books for $5+.

Paul Sanderson
07-28-2006, 05:34 AM
Trades seem to be the "in" thing at the moment, they seem to sell more than most other comics, and the fact they're widely available in book stores, not just comic stores, adds to their appeal to customers. So, it's only natural that one-shots in that format, have the potential to do well, as T.J. May describes in his previous post in this thread. They're obviously doing well for him, which is cool, so the potential is there for everyone if they have the right product at a good price.

L Jamal
07-28-2006, 10:23 AM
Trades sell less than the average comic. They have on average 1-10% of the sales of the cooresponding comic. Top selling comics reach 100K where as the top trades sell around 10K.

I think OGNs are better than mini series, but the market isn't friendly to either.

Paul Sanderson
07-30-2006, 04:45 AM
But they're available in book stores where regular comics are not. Do you have sales figures from book stores to quote?

L Jamal
07-30-2006, 10:15 AM
They are only available in books stores if you can get a distributor to carry them and then they are returnable and then there's a huge gap between when you make them available and when you get paid.