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WickedWiggins
08-05-2006, 01:01 PM
Man, How long does it take to get an artist involved with a project? I mean I have asked for artists who want to be involved to step forward on two seperate forums, and I have gotten nothing! I've even had good crits for my posted sample script, and still nothing! I mean there is a deadline as in most cases so I can't just sit back, and wait. Its like the only time anyone is ever interested is when money is involved. Like money is more important then the love for what your doing is what it seems like. Anyways, I just constantly feel like I'm just here for nothing, and should move on to other things for a career. Maybe I should. :(

Spacious Interior
08-05-2006, 01:50 PM
Don't lose all hope. I now I want to get back in the game in a bad way. I was doing a lot of comic work for all 3 biggies at one point. I stepped out of it keeping only my ties to liscencing for personal reasons...and now... getting back in is like pulling teeth.

It isn't that nobody wants a piece of your project, but as for me (and people in my position) there is a career that has me booked solid 24/7/365 and comics have become second hat. Basically, the only comic related jobs I take now are the ones that I can fit into my schedual.

On that note, I'm really curious as to what you have planned.

T.J. May
08-05-2006, 02:08 PM
The only way I have found artists to work for "free" is if there is no doubt it will be published. But to even get to that point, I paid in full for three stories to be published, promoted and distributed. Including checks to the artists for their work.

In the last 6 months I have had several very good-to-great artists contact me about collaborations. In these collaborations we will split the ownership 50/50, and a few even offered to pony up money to get a project out because they have that much faith in my writing/ marketing skills.

Now, to back up, the most I ever paid per page for art was $30. Which is not bad at all. I paid far less for art on the other 2 projects. But to answer your question of how long.....well....Ill Conceived came out in the fall of 2004, and I have been working on writing in earnest since '99. So, depending on how you look at it, it has taken me 2-7 years to get to this point.

T

WickedWiggins
08-05-2006, 03:49 PM
Don't lose all hope. I now I want to get back in the game in a bad way. I was doing a lot of comic work for all 3 biggies at one point. I stepped out of it keeping only my ties to liscencing for personal reasons...and now... getting back in is like pulling teeth.

It isn't that nobody wants a piece of your project, but as for me (and people in my position) there is a career that has me booked solid 24/7/365 and comics have become second hat. Basically, the only comic related jobs I take now are the ones that I can fit into my schedual.

On that note, I'm really curious as to what you have planned.

Its just a small 10 page black and white for submission to Arcana's new anthology called Dark Thresholds.

Caleb Monroe
08-05-2006, 04:31 PM
I would also suggest maybe finding an artist you would like to work with and approaching them directly, rather than just waiting for random people to respond to your ad. The personal touch can help a lot.

You might alos want to scope out the "Places to Find a Collaborator" section of my Creator Services page (link in sig).

trialsze
08-05-2006, 04:36 PM
I am sorry you can't find anyone but just realize that for an artist this not his creation. He/she doesn't have the connection you do to it and that is why money is important, plus it takes a lot of time to draw pages. You can write all ten pages in a day, not a penciler. If he is doing this part time then he will be lucky to get two pages a week done. Not saying you will not find someone to do it but just remember that the artist probably doesn't have the connection to the product you have and that is probably the reason that you are having problems. Just my two cents and I hope it helps. If I knew of an artist looking for a break I would send them your way.

WickedWiggins
08-05-2006, 05:42 PM
I totally understand the time restraints for a penciler which is why I'm looking now with a deadline of October. As for aproching an artist I've tried that as well and seems they are busy bees. Guess I'll just suck it up, stop being a big baby, and write as much as possible. Good fortunes come to those who wait. Thanks guys, and Caleb your Blog or whatever it maybe has helped a bunch. Thank you.

Fuego
08-06-2006, 09:46 AM
If the story is important to you should really consider paying. It doesn't have to be much. You can offer $150 for the ten pages, thats not that much money, but that way you ge the artist to work towards an imediate goal wich is mych better than having an artist say they want to work with you but then prioritize all the paying jobs over the project with you. And since this is not the artist baby, you willing to put your money where your mouth is shows an artist that you are really serious about the project and willing to do what is needed to see publication.
Hope this helps.
Fernando

L Jamal
08-06-2006, 09:54 AM
Like TJ said being established helps. Being published helps more.
Holding on to those you find helps the most.

MrGranger
08-06-2006, 10:28 AM
And don't get too upset when they leave for more $$. Artists need to eat.

Erik Roman
08-06-2006, 10:32 AM
I am sorry you can't find anyone but just realize that for an artist this not his creation. He/she doesn't have the connection you do to it and that is why money is important, plus it takes a lot of time to draw pages. You can write all ten pages in a day, not a penciler. If he is doing this part time then he will be lucky to get two pages a week done. Not saying you will not find someone to do it but just remember that the artist probably doesn't have the connection to the product you have and that is probably the reason that you are having problems. Just my two cents and I hope it helps. If I knew of an artist looking for a break I would send them your way.

Ok -- from an artists point of view.

This (above) is pretty much correct.

If you aren't offering payment then why would an illustrator want to spend their limited amount of spare time working on someone else's vision for nothing?


My advice -- Don't approch an illustrator with a fully done, completely finished script. With no payment and no say in the story and/or property there is zero incentive to be nothing more than a drawing monkey for someone else.
If you are not willing to pay a reasonable rate, then you should find an illustrator you like and work with him (or her) building a property or concept from the ground up that BOTH parties have a stake in and is a true collaboration.

~e.

WickedWiggins
08-06-2006, 12:18 PM
okay first off... I'm not getting any type of pay for this and heck it may not even be accepted into the book so there is no way of any payment from me. As for the "drawing monkey" bit, I allow whatever changes they think work best for the story so long as they tell me before hand. If it makes an improvement in the movement of the script, then why not? Whatever, guess I'll finish the script and put it away. :yawn:

Buckyrig
08-06-2006, 12:58 PM
And don't get too upset when they leave for more $$. Artists need to eat.

I do not like this attitude. It is poor work ethic, in or out of comics. It's not living up to your responsibilities...especially if there is paper involved. Now yes, in the real world this happens all the time, but in other industries I would often be compensated by the larger company in this kind of transaction.

I think most people are reasonable and will find a way to work this thing out with you if you get an opportunity. But what am I supposed to do with a partially done book and X number of dollars out of pocket when you bail?

Mr.Musgrave
08-06-2006, 01:12 PM
okay first off... I'm not getting any type of pay for this and heck it may not even be accepted into the book so there is no way of any payment from me. As for the "drawing monkey" bit, I allow whatever changes they think work best for the story so long as they tell me before hand. If it makes an improvement in the movement of the script, then why not? Whatever, guess I'll finish the script and put it away. :yawn:



This attitude here is why you're having trouble finding someone. I don't care if you're not getting any pay out of it. It's your project, you're hiring someone to complete it for you. Why do people expect commercial artists to work for free I'll never understand. It's a business. Deal with it.

Mr.Musgrave
08-06-2006, 01:14 PM
I do not like this attitude. It is poor work ethic, in or out of comics. It's not living up to your responsibilities...especially if there is paper involved. Now yes, in the real world this happens all the time, but in other industries I would often be compensated by the larger company in this kind of transaction.

I think most people are reasonable and will find a way to work this thing out with you if you get an opportunity. But what am I supposed to do with a partially done book and X number of dollars out of pocket when you bail?


This is what contracts are for. And this is the real world. Just because it's comics and art doesn't mean it suddenly operates by "special rules for cheap bastards."

This thread reminds me why I flippin' quit.

Buckyrig
08-06-2006, 01:30 PM
This is what contracts are for. And this is the real world. Just because it's comics and art doesn't mean it suddenly operates by "special rules for cheap bastards."

I'm not sure if you're agreeing or contradicting me.

Enforcing a contract costs money and time...butr that's not anyone's problem but the employer...just like the artist/employee's financial problems are not the employer's problem outside of agreed upon payment terms.

The "real world" comment is a reaction to the very idea that I sould merely be happy for an artist I've hired if he cuts and runs without fulfilling his contract. The fact that that attitude even exists among creators pulls us a little out of the real world in my opinion.

People break contracts every day, but I think there is this implied indemnity in this industry. "It's not a contract unless it is from Marvel, DC, Dark Horse, etc"

If I managed a band and a major label wanted to sign them, but I could not be part of the package, I would be compensated.

Screeny
08-06-2006, 01:35 PM
I'm restoring a car at the moment and I can't for the life of me get anyone the restore the engine or lay down a new paint job for me without them wanting to get paid! What's wrong with them - it's my car and I'm not making any money out of it. Surely their love of engine restoration and airbrushing should be payment enough!

See how that works?

joshm
08-06-2006, 01:56 PM
okay first off... I'm not getting any type of pay for this and heck it may not even be accepted into the book so there is no way of any payment from me. As for the "drawing monkey" bit, I allow whatever changes they think work best for the story so long as they tell me before hand. If it makes an improvement in the movement of the script, then why not? Whatever, guess I'll finish the script and put it away. :yawn:

I'm sure you've given up if you're talking like this now. If you can't put $150 into 10 pages of work, then this story isn't worth yours or an artistís time. I don't mind doing work for less then I normally get paid if the story is good, but if you're not willing to put any risk into it, then you need to be working on another story. Until you're sure a story will be successful, then why bother. Not saying, just because you think it will be successful it will be, but you've got to at least believe in it.

Personally, I donít work for free ever, unless it is a 50/50 calibration. Plus, Iíve got one of these going already, so I wouldnít take any work unless Iím getting paid something. If you have a deadline, you need to put forth some kind of cash or incentive, such as, ďit will be published.Ē If not, then youíre not going to find an artist for awhile. If you do, you still run the risk of loosing him/her to a paying job, so pay is always better for both parties and a contract.

Josh

HeroStreet Press
08-06-2006, 02:04 PM
I'm restoring a car at the moment and I can't for the life of me get anyone the restore the engine or lay down a new paint job for me without them wanting to get paid! What's wrong with them - it's my car and I'm not making any money out of it. Surely their love of engine restoration and airbrushing should be payment enough!

...what kinda car we talkin' here?

Screeny
08-06-2006, 02:12 PM
:laugh: It's a 1974 VW Westfalia Camper...

WickedWiggins
08-06-2006, 02:23 PM
wow.. lets get a little rude now! :cry: I haven't given up on my writing just on finding an artist. Anyways, I can see this is going south real fast so I'm just gonna go somewhere else. I don't need the insults. :sure:

ShanE
08-06-2006, 04:00 PM
No matter where you go, it will be the same. Good luck, you get what you pay for. And as far artists running off and breaking contracts, they are more than likely artists who haven't been published or just don't do it for a living. In my world, if you pay me to do your story, that amount of dedication and energy is a signature of a mature and serious professional that understands the the marketplace and how it runs. They then deserve my full attention and the best of what I can give as an artist.
If I find a project worth working on by a previosuly published author, as a collaberative project, as much as I might love it and want to work on it (I have 2 of those right now) I have to put them on the back burner 90% of the time to get the paying clients out to pay my bills and take care of family. Personally I love graphic novels and comics and it shows in my work. Its weird to think some writers feel like if you don't jump at the oppotunity to work with them for free, then you must not like comics. Quite the opposite, I love comics enough that I am willing to spend many hours (as much as 14 a day) to make sure your work is seen in the best light and the best art I can give. And the best you can do is pay for the service which increases both our chances at getting published and have your efforts see by hundreds to share your story, how can you say you love comics more than the artist when you won't even consider to pay to have it seen in the best possible light?
No one seeing your comic will get you no where fast.

HeroStreet Press
08-06-2006, 06:52 PM
:laugh: It's a 1974 VW Westfalia Camper...

I am SO in, man

The Anti-crest
08-06-2006, 08:18 PM
I'm sure you've given up if you're talking like this now. If you can't put $150 into 10 pages of work, then this story isn't worth yours or an artistís time. I don't mind doing work for less then I normally get paid if the story is good, but if you're not willing to put any risk into it, then you need to be working on another story. Until you're sure a story will be successful, then why bother. Not saying, just because you think it will be successful it will be, but you've got to at least believe in it.

Personally, I donít work for free ever, unless it is a 50/50 calibration. Plus, Iíve got one of these going already, so I wouldnít take any work unless Iím getting paid something. If you have a deadline, you need to put forth some kind of cash or incentive, such as, ďit will be published.Ē If not, then youíre not going to find an artist for awhile. If you do, you still run the risk of loosing him/her to a paying job, so pay is always better for both parties and a contract.

Josh

and

No matter where you go, it will be the same. Good luck, you get what you pay for. And as far artists running off and breaking contracts, they are more than likely artists who haven't been published or just don't do it for a living. In my world, if you pay me to do your story, that amount of dedication and energy is a signature of a mature and serious professional that understands the the marketplace and how it runs. They then deserve my full attention and the best of what I can give as an artist.
If I find a project worth working on by a previosuly published author, as a collaberative project, as much as I might love it and want to work on it (I have 2 of those right now) I have to put them on the back burner 90% of the time to get the paying clients out to pay my bills and take care of family. Personally I love graphic novels and comics and it shows in my work. Its weird to think some writers feel like if you don't jump at the oppotunity to work with them for free, then you must not like comics. Quite the opposite, I love comics enough that I am willing to spend many hours (as much as 14 a day) to make sure your work is seen in the best light and the best art I can give. And the best you can do is pay for the service which increases both our chances at getting published and have your efforts see by hundreds to share your story, how can you say you love comics more than the artist when you won't even consider to pay to have it seen in the best possible light?
No one seeing your comic will get you no where fast.


That is the truth of it too. I'm a writer and I stumbled on this story in my head a while ago and I felt it was something that deserves publishing, deserves full color and professional art. I can't see the story coming out any other way so I found an artist through DW and I am paying him what he asked. It's the most exciting thing in the world to really vibe with an artist on a project and when you really appreciate what they can do for you.

I've looked for artists for years and expected them to just jump on board and help me get my story out and get it published with their flashy art. Until I found a story I felt HAD to read that point. Once that happened I wanted to pay someone and make a contract so it would all fall into place.

chris stevens
08-06-2006, 09:08 PM
i've worked with good and bad, and i've been both of those in my dealings with artists. truth is, it's a hard pursuit on either side if you're not locked into a company structure backing the outcome...and the closer you are to beginning, writers especially, the more tangled and obscured your feelings regarding the matter will be once money comes into play...but it's all part and principle of the thing, and nothing that can be taught.

Mr.Musgrave
08-06-2006, 09:46 PM
wow.. lets get a little rude now! :cry: I haven't given up on my writing just on finding an artist. Anyways, I can see this is going south real fast so I'm just gonna go somewhere else. I don't need the insults. :sure:


Then stop insulting the artists by expecting them to work for free on your project.

D.J. Coffman
08-06-2006, 10:00 PM
I want to give all you aspiring writers here a word of advice. MONEY. If you don't got it, get it. You don't need much... but let me tell you what.... I didn't work for free, but kept a VERY low page rater-- writers who were serious, found me and paid me my low and beyond fair rate. Now, most of the writers are all published by MAJOR publishers. Dark Horse, Image, IDW, etc... Do you want me to name a few? I won't though out of courtesy-- but trust me, I ain't lyin.

I'm not saying "don't be cheap" -- but I am saying there's a point where you stop doing this for fun and start doing it full on in SERIOUS mode-- And it's pretty unprofessional to expect something for nothing.

Again, re-read the first paragraph there. I can name 4 writers I worked with in the past who paid me, got their names out there more and now they have more work with BIG publishers.

Offer an artist you like SOMETHING. Hey, 10-20 bucks a page even! That 10 page sample costs you 100-150 bucks to have produced and could lead to MORE work for you.

INvest in yourselves if you believe in your writing.

T.J. May
08-06-2006, 10:14 PM
INvest in yourselves if you believe in your writing.


Too true. The other thing we writers have to look at it is if you are paying work-for-hire, or collaborating. If I am paying an artist, then I retain the rights to the story beyond the comic. In some cases I have retained full-copyrights and original art.

So, my investment not only gets me out there under better lights, but the risk/reward factor could be huge if the projects goes beyond comics.

The flip side to that is, if I'm working on a true collaboration, 50/50 all the way then I don't expect to have to pay the artist.

But that all gets ironed out with at the contract stage.

T

Imboden
08-07-2006, 12:03 AM
Offering blow jobs works wonders.
:confused:

T.J. May
08-07-2006, 08:14 AM
Offering blow jobs works wonders.
:confused:

Or a Fist of Justice. :huh: :whistlin:

MatthewMonster
08-07-2006, 12:44 PM
I want to give all you aspiring writers here a word of advice. MONEY. If you don't got it, get it. You don't need much... but let me tell you what.... I didn't work for free, but kept a VERY low page rater-- writers who were serious, found me and paid me my low and beyond fair rate. Now, most of the writers are all published by MAJOR publishers. Dark Horse, Image, IDW, etc... Do you want me to name a few? I won't though out of courtesy-- but trust me, I ain't lyin.

I'm not saying "don't be cheap" -- but I am saying there's a point where you stop doing this for fun and start doing it full on in SERIOUS mode-- And it's pretty unprofessional to expect something for nothing.

Again, re-read the first paragraph there. I can name 4 writers I worked with in the past who paid me, got their names out there more and now they have more work with BIG publishers.

Offer an artist you like SOMETHING. Hey, 10-20 bucks a page even! That 10 page sample costs you 100-150 bucks to have produced and could lead to MORE work for you.

INvest in yourselves if you believe in your writing.

DJ is 200% right.

MrGranger
08-07-2006, 12:46 PM
I do not like this attitude. It is poor work ethic, in or out of comics.

Maybe...but it happens so all I'm saying is don't get too stressed. When you've got essentially volunteers then things happen and they have to bow out. I know it's not good form, but for me I want all the artists working with me to succeed and fully understand when a $60+ a page offer comes that they can't keep working with us.

Buckyrig
08-07-2006, 01:19 PM
Maybe...but it happens so all I'm saying is don't get too stressed.

I'm not sure how clear I've been on this...I'm talking about when I am paying them. If I have paid any significant amount and they bail and I am left with what are essentially unusable pages...well that is tantamount to stealing in my book.

When you've got essentially volunteers then things happen and they have to bow out. I know it's not good form, but for me I want all the artists working with me to succeed and fully understand when a $60+ a page offer comes that they can't keep working with us.

If it is someone working on spec, ok fine. Makes perfect sense.

I knew the original poster was gonna get a good dose of reality, so I wasn't commenting on the main thrust of the thread, just the implication (or even inference to a degree) that being screwed out of money is something to take in stride.

MrGranger
08-07-2006, 01:35 PM
I'm not saying "don't be cheap" -- but I am saying there's a point where you stop doing this for fun and start doing it full on in SERIOUS mode-- And it's pretty unprofessional to expect something for nothing.

Good point, that's why I ask that all the creators I publish at least pay people $10 a page. It's hard when we're doing mostly graphic novels, it's about $1k a book...but that's helped a lot.

And now look at all the writers who can say DJ worked for me and I only paid him $20 a page. What a steal!!!

uncle wya
08-07-2006, 01:47 PM
Man, How long does it take to get an artist involved with a project?
Basically you are asking how long does it take to make a friend. If there is no money involved then there is no hiring at all. You gotta make friends, collaborate, this takes time. The guys I worked for free with were someone I wanted to work with because I read thier posts, they seemed friendly, I liked thier other work. You coming on here complaining about not getting artists will actually ruin quiet a lot of chances because it comes off pretty harsh and whiny. Complain less, work more, make friends, post often.

chris stevens
08-07-2006, 02:53 PM
"Complain less, work more, make friends, post often."

amen.

WickedWiggins
08-07-2006, 05:01 PM
First off, I wasn't complaining about anything. If I came off like that I didn't mean for it. As for all your comments, I agree! However, what am I to do if I don't have the money to front? I'm currently unemployed. Like I said, I guess I'll just keep at it. It's all I can do at the moment. Once again, Sorry if I came off as an arse... but really I didn't need the posts from some of you, or atleast the harshness of them. Anyways, take care everyone. Back to writing I go.

D.J. Coffman
08-07-2006, 05:33 PM
First off, I wasn't complaining about anything. If I came off like that I didn't mean for it. As for all your comments, I agree! However, what am I to do if I don't have the money to front? I'm currently unemployed. Like I said, I guess I'll just keep at it. It's all I can do at the moment. Once again, Sorry if I came off as an arse... but really I didn't need the posts from some of you, or atleast the harshness of them. Anyways, take care everyone. Back to writing I go.

Well, what are you to do? Get a job! Save money, etc, etc. It's common sense. Maybe put away this stuff for awhile, a couple months?-- and focus on getting an income, save up a little bankroll, then come back and BAM! Hire yourself some talent.

Also, what Wya said is true too--- it's even BETTER when you do what he said AND have a little bit of dough to spend. Heck, 150 bucks isn't really all that much to save up

Scott Story
08-07-2006, 06:04 PM
Man, How long does it take to get an artist involved with a project? I mean I have asked for artists who want to be involved to step forward on two seperate forums, and I have gotten nothing! I've even had good crits for my posted sample script, and still nothing! I mean there is a deadline as in most cases so I can't just sit back, and wait. Its like the only time anyone is ever interested is when money is involved. Like money is more important then the love for what your doing is what it seems like. Anyways, I just constantly feel like I'm just here for nothing, and should move on to other things for a career. Maybe I should.

The reason you have to pay artists is because most of them are good enough storytellers to put together their own comic. (I say storyteller, not writer, though many artists are also good writers.) Thus, if they are going to do a story for free, they are more likely to do their own. Even if you script is pure gold, thier own stories/characters will seem cooler to them most of the time. Thus, it's good to hire artists, sign contracts, and make it professional.

Exception: Some artists want exposure, so if you can guarantee them publication, that might bring them on board for free.

Many artists aren't looking for collaboration, because they already have a group of friends they collaborate with.

Lynn Lefey
08-07-2006, 07:02 PM
For me, I think getting ANY pay is good, even only a few $ per page. It makes an artist feel that their work actually has value. Consider it something like 'Token payment'. "I like your art, but I'm poor. Here is the tiny amount I can give you to show my undying appreciation for your effort, although it's much less than you deserve". Something like that.

If someone can draw a comic, they can write a comic. That's not to say they can write one WELL, but they CAN write one. So, as unfair as it may seem, when you're a no-name, the artist is the more important of the Artist/writer pair.

It takes me a day to do a good page of color work (yes, I'm slow). It took me a month to write a 85,000 word novel. So, the effort I'd put into a single issue of a comic would be the same as what it would take me to write an entire novel. The penciller has the absolute, without question, heaviest workload on a comic.

The entire point here is, unless your writing work is ungodly spectacular, and you can catch the interest of an artist, then you're not likely to find someone to work for free. If your writing really IS that good, start talking to indovidual artist. Every now and then, artists post in the Talent Wanted section, looking for good writers to work with.

Some years back, a friend of mine went through what you're going through, only he sunk a big chunk of money into getting books done. He's so soured on the experience that he doesn't write any more. My advice, if you're serious, is put on the thick skin, network, and keep working on your craft. It may take a while, but you can make it happen if you persist.

uncle wya
08-07-2006, 07:36 PM
Many artists aren't looking for collaboration, because they already have a group of friends they collaborate with.

Well that doesn't mean you can't become part of that group. Making friends is the best way to collaborate. And it really isn't that hard.

Jess Hall
08-07-2006, 07:53 PM
This is a great thread!

The only advice I would is 'think outside the box'. I enrolled in a some art classes at my Community College. My original thinking was that I would learn to communicate to an artist better if I could THINK like an artist. It was a big help in that regard but the best part of taking the class was the networking. I became good friends with an artist and we are getting a book together. It is veeeeeery slowly coming together but is finally happening.

Now, I am in a position to hire an artist and self-publish another project that I am very excited about. The only concern I have about hiring an artist is that they might 'phone' it in. I want an artist that brings everything he or she has to the book.

Scott Story
08-07-2006, 09:34 PM
Well that doesn't mean you can't become part of that group. Making friends is the best way to collaborate. And it really isn't that hard.

Yeah, that's true. I've made a lot of friends in comics over the years, and quite a few friends from among this motley group at DW. Most comic creators are really easy to get along with.

Speaking of a friend, I read Darkora's (aka Jeff Stevenson's) Image book, Task Force 1, issues 1 & 2, and it's really good. The writing is good, of course, but the dialogue was great.

Biofungus
08-07-2006, 09:53 PM
I will pencil your story, for only 5 dollars. Only thing is, I will draw it all on *one* page, and it will be on the back of an index card.


:p

wisper
08-07-2006, 11:05 PM
wow.. lets get a little rude now! :cry: I haven't given up on my writing just on finding an artist. Anyways, I can see this is going south real fast so I'm just gonna go somewhere else. I don't need the insults. :sure:


a good insult might motivate ya!

get a credit card/ get cash pay for artwork...if you don't have enough faith in doing this then what does that tell you...

The Anti-crest
08-07-2006, 11:13 PM
First off, I wasn't complaining about anything. If I came off like that I didn't mean for it. As for all your comments, I agree! However, what am I to do if I don't have the money to front? I'm currently unemployed. Like I said, I guess I'll just keep at it. It's all I can do at the moment. Once again, Sorry if I came off as an arse... but really I didn't need the posts from some of you, or atleast the harshness of them. Anyways, take care everyone. Back to writing I go.


The artist I'm working with for my book wanted 50 a page, which was really good compared to some of the other artists I talked to who wanted more than twice that sometimes. My story comes to 24 pages of art($1200 total) and that is way more than I can afford, at once.

I started putting a little a way and me and the artist came to an agreement of paying over time as he completes the work which leaves him doing 6 pages of art a month, and leaves him open for other work as well as having plenty of time to finish each section of the book.

There are ways around every problem. Definetly get a job or talk to people who believe in your dream. If you can get a family member to front the money for a small 5 or 10 page story then at least you'd have something people can read and know that you know what your doing.

HeroStreet Press
08-07-2006, 11:32 PM
I will pencil your story, for only 5 dollars. Only thing is, I will draw it all on *one* page, and it will be on the back of an index card.


:p

Deal. But you have to really be able to capture the emotional depth of my characters!