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Old 08-05-2006, 01:01 PM   #1
WickedWiggins
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When, Oh when?

Man, How long does it take to get an artist involved with a project? I mean I have asked for artists who want to be involved to step forward on two seperate forums, and I have gotten nothing! I've even had good crits for my posted sample script, and still nothing! I mean there is a deadline as in most cases so I can't just sit back, and wait. Its like the only time anyone is ever interested is when money is involved. Like money is more important then the love for what your doing is what it seems like. Anyways, I just constantly feel like I'm just here for nothing, and should move on to other things for a career. Maybe I should.
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Old 08-05-2006, 01:50 PM   #2
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Don't lose all hope. I now I want to get back in the game in a bad way. I was doing a lot of comic work for all 3 biggies at one point. I stepped out of it keeping only my ties to liscencing for personal reasons...and now... getting back in is like pulling teeth.

It isn't that nobody wants a piece of your project, but as for me (and people in my position) there is a career that has me booked solid 24/7/365 and comics have become second hat. Basically, the only comic related jobs I take now are the ones that I can fit into my schedual.

On that note, I'm really curious as to what you have planned.
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Old 08-05-2006, 02:08 PM   #3
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The only way I have found artists to work for "free" is if there is no doubt it will be published. But to even get to that point, I paid in full for three stories to be published, promoted and distributed. Including checks to the artists for their work.

In the last 6 months I have had several very good-to-great artists contact me about collaborations. In these collaborations we will split the ownership 50/50, and a few even offered to pony up money to get a project out because they have that much faith in my writing/ marketing skills.

Now, to back up, the most I ever paid per page for art was $30. Which is not bad at all. I paid far less for art on the other 2 projects. But to answer your question of how long.....well....Ill Conceived came out in the fall of 2004, and I have been working on writing in earnest since '99. So, depending on how you look at it, it has taken me 2-7 years to get to this point.

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Old 08-05-2006, 03:49 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spacious Interior
Don't lose all hope. I now I want to get back in the game in a bad way. I was doing a lot of comic work for all 3 biggies at one point. I stepped out of it keeping only my ties to liscencing for personal reasons...and now... getting back in is like pulling teeth.

It isn't that nobody wants a piece of your project, but as for me (and people in my position) there is a career that has me booked solid 24/7/365 and comics have become second hat. Basically, the only comic related jobs I take now are the ones that I can fit into my schedual.

On that note, I'm really curious as to what you have planned.
Its just a small 10 page black and white for submission to Arcana's new anthology called Dark Thresholds.
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Old 08-05-2006, 04:31 PM   #5
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I would also suggest maybe finding an artist you would like to work with and approaching them directly, rather than just waiting for random people to respond to your ad. The personal touch can help a lot.

You might alos want to scope out the "Places to Find a Collaborator" section of my Creator Services page (link in sig).
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Old 08-05-2006, 04:36 PM   #6
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I am sorry you can't find anyone but just realize that for an artist this not his creation. He/she doesn't have the connection you do to it and that is why money is important, plus it takes a lot of time to draw pages. You can write all ten pages in a day, not a penciler. If he is doing this part time then he will be lucky to get two pages a week done. Not saying you will not find someone to do it but just remember that the artist probably doesn't have the connection to the product you have and that is probably the reason that you are having problems. Just my two cents and I hope it helps. If I knew of an artist looking for a break I would send them your way.
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Old 08-05-2006, 05:42 PM   #7
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I totally understand the time restraints for a penciler which is why I'm looking now with a deadline of October. As for aproching an artist I've tried that as well and seems they are busy bees. Guess I'll just suck it up, stop being a big baby, and write as much as possible. Good fortunes come to those who wait. Thanks guys, and Caleb your Blog or whatever it maybe has helped a bunch. Thank you.
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Old 08-06-2006, 09:46 AM   #8
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If the story is important to you should really consider paying. It doesn't have to be much. You can offer $150 for the ten pages, thats not that much money, but that way you ge the artist to work towards an imediate goal wich is mych better than having an artist say they want to work with you but then prioritize all the paying jobs over the project with you. And since this is not the artist baby, you willing to put your money where your mouth is shows an artist that you are really serious about the project and willing to do what is needed to see publication.
Hope this helps.
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Old 08-06-2006, 09:54 AM   #9
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Like TJ said being established helps. Being published helps more.
Holding on to those you find helps the most.
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Old 08-06-2006, 10:28 AM   #10
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And don't get too upset when they leave for more $$. Artists need to eat.
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Old 08-06-2006, 10:32 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trialsze
I am sorry you can't find anyone but just realize that for an artist this not his creation. He/she doesn't have the connection you do to it and that is why money is important, plus it takes a lot of time to draw pages. You can write all ten pages in a day, not a penciler. If he is doing this part time then he will be lucky to get two pages a week done. Not saying you will not find someone to do it but just remember that the artist probably doesn't have the connection to the product you have and that is probably the reason that you are having problems. Just my two cents and I hope it helps. If I knew of an artist looking for a break I would send them your way.
Ok -- from an artists point of view.

This (above) is pretty much correct.

If you aren't offering payment then why would an illustrator want to spend their limited amount of spare time working on someone else's vision for nothing?


My advice -- Don't approch an illustrator with a fully done, completely finished script. With no payment and no say in the story and/or property there is zero incentive to be nothing more than a drawing monkey for someone else.
If you are not willing to pay a reasonable rate, then you should find an illustrator you like and work with him (or her) building a property or concept from the ground up that BOTH parties have a stake in and is a true collaboration.

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Old 08-06-2006, 12:18 PM   #12
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okay first off... I'm not getting any type of pay for this and heck it may not even be accepted into the book so there is no way of any payment from me. As for the "drawing monkey" bit, I allow whatever changes they think work best for the story so long as they tell me before hand. If it makes an improvement in the movement of the script, then why not? Whatever, guess I'll finish the script and put it away.
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Old 08-06-2006, 12:58 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGranger
And don't get too upset when they leave for more $$. Artists need to eat.
I do not like this attitude. It is poor work ethic, in or out of comics. It's not living up to your responsibilities...especially if there is paper involved. Now yes, in the real world this happens all the time, but in other industries I would often be compensated by the larger company in this kind of transaction.

I think most people are reasonable and will find a way to work this thing out with you if you get an opportunity. But what am I supposed to do with a partially done book and X number of dollars out of pocket when you bail?
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Old 08-06-2006, 01:12 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedWiggins
okay first off... I'm not getting any type of pay for this and heck it may not even be accepted into the book so there is no way of any payment from me. As for the "drawing monkey" bit, I allow whatever changes they think work best for the story so long as they tell me before hand. If it makes an improvement in the movement of the script, then why not? Whatever, guess I'll finish the script and put it away.


This attitude here is why you're having trouble finding someone. I don't care if you're not getting any pay out of it. It's your project, you're hiring someone to complete it for you. Why do people expect commercial artists to work for free I'll never understand. It's a business. Deal with it.
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Old 08-06-2006, 01:14 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckyrig
I do not like this attitude. It is poor work ethic, in or out of comics. It's not living up to your responsibilities...especially if there is paper involved. Now yes, in the real world this happens all the time, but in other industries I would often be compensated by the larger company in this kind of transaction.

I think most people are reasonable and will find a way to work this thing out with you if you get an opportunity. But what am I supposed to do with a partially done book and X number of dollars out of pocket when you bail?

This is what contracts are for. And this is the real world. Just because it's comics and art doesn't mean it suddenly operates by "special rules for cheap bastards."

This thread reminds me why I flippin' quit.
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